Monday, April 19, 2021

Day 19 - Book Spine Poetry" for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

 

This one is lots of fun. It's an intriguing way to “create” or, actually, “find” a poem by arranging and rearranging a stack of books horizontally that show the title on the book spine into something clever that might be a “poem.” Just like creating any poetry, you get to decide if it will happy or sad, serious or funny or whatever.

This is a FUN ONE to post on your own FB page and see how many of your friends want to create some Spine Poetry as well. Have fun! Cheers!!

Simply start perusing the titles on your bookshelves and pull out some that have possibilities and start stacking them up to see what you might discover.

Here are a few samples:


 












Elias of Elderberry
Persuaded
Davy Crockett and the King of the River
Winter is Not Forever
 




 








The Go-Getter 
Landlord
Never Can Say Good-bye
Behind the Scenes
 


 







Giant Steps
A Man, a Can, and a Plan,
Feeding a Giant
Big in Japan
Raw Power!

(all of the above Spine Poems are © Stephanie Abney)


Please remember – any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments section of this blog. They are the property of the person who shares them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them in any form without their express permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to it. Thanks!!

 And if you choose to post your poems on your own blog – that’s awesome. But please don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem and LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to read the instructions. Thanks for respecting my work.

Sunday, April 18, 2021

Day18 - “Acrostic Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth ”


OK, even though pretty much everyone has at least heard about if not written dozens of “acrostic poems,” ever since I went to China in 2016 to teach English I can’t NOT share this poetic form because of the cutest experience I had with one of my students there. You can read about it later in this post.

So, it only takes a few steps to write an ACROSTIC POEM:


1. Choose a name or the object of your poem.
2. Write that name or that word down the left-hand side of your paper vertically, generally using all capital letters.
3. Start each sentence of your poem with the capital letter on that line.
4. No need to worry about rhyming or counting syllables or anything.
5. Each line can be whatever length you choose, from one word to a longer sentence.

Example: 
One word/line acrostic for the name “Susan” (Yes, I know this is a lame example, but it’s just an example. I know you can do better):

S
uper
Unique
Sweet
Adorable
Nice

Or, use the first letter as the beginning of a sentence instead of a single word.

I've shared this in previous years, but I really can’t let this poetry form pass without sharing this delightful experience I had while teaching English in China once again. I had a 14-year-old student named “Fiona.” I explained how to write an acrostic poem and suggested to the students that they choose a favorite animal for their poem. I gave additional details and then they got busy.

Soon they were showing me their poems. They did a wonderful job. Then Fiona turned in her poem:

Snow is falling down.
No one wants to stay outside.
A little girl stands at my front door.
Knocks it with a little cry.
Early afternoon, she falls asleep in my room.


I read it and told it that it was a lovely poem but it had nothing to do with a snake. She replied, “But I wrote ‘snake’ down the left-hand side.”

So I explained that the poem also needed to be ABOUT a snake if that was the word she chose. So she said, “Okay,” took back her paper, added a few words, and turned it back in…

Here is what she added to that last line of “Early afternoon, she falls asleep in my room … and then she turned into a snake.”

 




I loved it!! Love her!! I laughed so hard. It is a cherished memory. And now, you can enjoy it too. Cheers!!


OK, your turn!!

Also – tomorrow we will be creating spine poetry – more details tomorrow morning. Cheers!!


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Saturday, April 17, 2021

Day 17 - “Haiku Poetry Day” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

  

Well, today, April 17, just happens to be both “International” and “National” “Haiku Poetry Day” so all you Haiku lovers – this is your lucky day! Cheers!! So, even though it is such a common and oft used poetry form, ya’ can’t hardly let “International/National Haiku Poetry Day just fly by without writing a Haiku poem, right? So, here’s just a few tidbits about it.

Haiku is a popular and well-known form of poetry that started in Japan in the sixteenth century.

It usually centers on a nature theme, but you can make one up about anything.

Haiku poems don’t rhyme but they do follow a pattern.

They are very short, structured poems with three lines and a total of 17 syllables. The lines in a haiku follow a set pattern: 

 

Line 1: 5 syllables

Line 2: 7 syllables

Line 3: 5 syllables

 

You need to pay attention to the number of SYLLABLES, not words.

Here are a couple of examples:


A soft, gentle breeze
Tickles leaves in my front yard
And I know He’s there.

          © 2011 Stephanie Abney

 








Golden ball of fire
Slips behind the horizon
A desert goodnight

          © 2014 Stephanie Abney

(Photo courtesy of Bob Murray of Scottsdale, AZ - used with permission)

And as a “heads up” for MONDAY (Apr.19) start glancing at the book spines on your shelves because we will be doing “Book Spine” poetry where you stack up books flat on top of each other with the spine side showing in a way that the titles make up a “poem” 


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Friday, April 16, 2021

Day 16 ~ Tyburn Poem for “30 poems in 30 days" #NationalPoetryMonth

 

You all have been doing great so how about a doozy of a challenge today? OK, great, hold onto your hats!! Woozier! This is beyond tricky, but I think y’all can have lots of fun with it. I first tried this poetic form. a couple of years ago. Prior to that, I had never heard of it. (OH, and if this discourages you – and that is NOT my desire – just write any poem you choose and COME BACK TOMORROW and see if you like the next one better). I do hope a bunch of you will try this one though. It really stretches your skills as poets and writers (and thinkers). So . . .

Tyburn poems are deceiving in that to look at a completed poem, it appears simple enough. Yeah, right! But it’s a good writing exercise. I’ve tried to explain it step by step and even created a little chart to help you out. Plus there are a couple of websites that help with description and rhyming that I think you will find useful.

Here we go:

We are back to counting syllables and lines. This is a SIX-LINE poem and the first 4 lines are EACH a SINGLE DESCRIPTIVE WORD with TWO SYLLABLES, that all RHYME and make sense together. Phew!! We’re not done . . .

The last two lines (5 & 6) are EACH NINE SYLLABLES LONG, and Line 5 incorporates the first two of the words of the poem while Line 6 incorporates the next two of the words of the poem IN A SPECIFIC PLACE.

Line 5 will have 4 syllables (any word count, just FOUR syllables) and then the repeated words from lines 1 and 2 and then . . .

Line 6 has 4 syllables (any word count, just FOUR syllables) and then the repeated words from lines 3 and 4 . . .

AND then each line ENDS with just ONE word – with only ONE syllable and they have to rhyme with each other (but do not need to rhyme with lines 1-4).

So, if you choose a word that ends in “y” to start off your poem – they will all probably need to end in “y” and if you choose an “ing” ending word, then they will all need to end with “ing” (that’s just for lines 1-4). Better look at the examples AND the chart!

You can give this poem a title if you wish.

I know you can do it!! Cheers!!

Here is an example I found on the web – it’s rather lite-hearted and cute:


PEANUT BUTTER

Nutty,
Sticky,
Crunchy,
Tasty,
Peanut butter, nutty, sticky spread
With jellied bread, crunchy, tasty fed

                                                                                Copyright © 2016 Charles Sides  


Handy little site to find some “Describing Words” ~ https://describingwords.io/ ~ just plug the word you want to describe and then click the search button.

This site not only helps you find rhyming words, but it separates them into 1 syllable words, 2 syllable words, etc. https://www.rhymer.com/ - RHYMER

This poetry form can be labor intensive – but following the process creates such a great little poem. But, please forgive me if I don’t write new examples this year. I’ve got SO much on my plate right now.

Okay, here is my first one:












Poetry

 
Lyric
Cryptic
Magic
Epic
Poetry month, lyric, cryptic, jots
Share emotions, magic, epic thoughts

                                    © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

Hope this little chart that I created proves helpful ~

And after my second example, below the chart, I outline, step-by-step, my thought process in writing one of my examples: Maybe that will help as well.

 

# of syllables per line

Rhyming pattern

Meter & where to repeat words

Hints of what should be used per line

2

A

aa

One word adjective with 2 syllables

2

A

bb

Different one word adjective with 2 syllables

2

A

cc

Different one word adjective with 2 syllables

2

A

dd

Different one word adjective with 2 syllables

9

B

xxxxaabbB

Any four syllables then aa, bb, single syllable word

9

B

xxxxccddB

Any four syllables then cc, dd, single syllable word

                      Tyburn Poetic Form Chart © 2019 Stephanie Abney

Here is my second one:

Satan
 
Cunning
Lying
Cheating
Tempting
Heartless trickster, cunning, lying, doled
Flattering lies, cheating, sneaking, cold

                                                                                    © 2019 Stephanie Abney

My “thought process” while I tried to figure it out: So, first I made a list of some adjectives (“ing” words) – more than I needed and then another list that could be used in lines 5 & 6 – then I started playing around with it, crossed off the words I didn’t want to use, which left me with 4 descriptive words and then I created lines 5 & 6, incorporating the words from lines 1 & 2 and lines 3 & 4, respectively:

Satan
Cunning
Charming
Lying
Raging
Cheating
Sneaking
Tempting

Words to possibly use in lines 5 & 6: Crafty, jealous, avenging, heartless, destructive, destroy, destroying, bitter, conniving, flatter, flattery, cowardly, trickster, tricking, tricky, malicious, deceitful, cold, sneaky, creepy, creep, reap, reaper, damned, persistent, tenacious, dangerous, rob, steal, louse, angry, anger

And I posted the finished product from this effort above, just under the chart.

READY? Go try this one out!! Cheers!!


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

Day 15 – “Shadorma Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

 

How about a poem that is said to have originated in Spain? (I haven’t been able to document that). I’ve only used it in the challenge a couple of times in the past. What do you say? Want to give it a try?

This poem has 6 lines per stanza. It’s not a very common poetry form and may be new to many of you. It’s called “Shadorama” and it is made up of 6 lines per stanza with a specific syllable count, but no need for rhyming.

It can be a one-verse stand-alone poem or you can string together as many 6-line stanzas as you wish to complete your poem (following the correct syllable count). Most lines only have 3 syllables so choose your words carefully to be able to get your point across. I have often found that in poetry “less is more” and with just the right words amazing pictures can be painted and they can be very thought-provoking.

This is another poem where we need to pay attention to the syllable count:

There is no rhyming scheme but the syllables per line are very precise: 3/5/3/3/7/5

 
Line 1 ~ 3 syllables
Line 2 ~ 5 syllables
Line 3 ~ 3 syllables
Line 4 ~ 3 syllables
Line 5 ~ 7 syllables
Line 6 ~ 5 syllables
 
So, here are three different examples I wrote a couple of years ago.
I could have opted for a much longer poem by adding additional stanzas.
But these will give you the main idea.
I can’t wait to see what y’all come up with!! Cheers!!
 

EXAMPLES:

 

Grandchildren
Fill my heart with joy
Give me hugs
And artwork
They are so entertaining
I lead a charmed life

         © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 


 

I marvel
When I pause to look
At sunrise
And sunset
At the beauty of the earth
God has made for us

         © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

 



My grandson
Calls me to come see
He’s in awe
Nature’s feast
He is guarding a treasure
For our eyes only

         © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

Your turn. Cheers!!!!

 

 PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

 

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Day 14 ~ “I Wish, but I Am” Poem for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

 

I Wish, but I Am ~ so, tell us your deepest thoughts or just be silly if  you please. You can even fill in the blanks any way you wish. You’re in charge. These lines are just to get you started. This one is so fun and easy that you can write several of them. Or change the beginning words to those that work for you (concentrate on words of feeling and being for the beginning of each line). 

Here we go:

Line 1: I wish 

Line 2: Like 

Line 3: And I dream

Line 4: I am

Line 5: I used to

Line 6: But now I

Line 7: I seem to

Line 8: But I'm really


So here’s a silly one I wrote a few years ago and a new, more serious one I wrote just now (I put the beginning phrases in blue in my examples so you can see how it goes):













Celery and Chocolate
I wish chocolate had zero calories
Like this celery stick in my hand
I am deluding myself it would seem
I seem to be getting control of my food
But I'm really just full of whip cream
And I dream of mouthfuls of ice cream
I used to eat whatever I wanted
But now I eat things that are green

                                © 2015 Stephanie Abney



Wishful Thinking
I wish everyone would get along,            
Like the Lord has taught us to do.
And I dream of a world full of smiling faces,
I am an eternal optimist.
I used to think being happy was easy,
But now too many people act discouraged.
I seem to be seeking the impossible,
But I'm really just longing for home.
 
        © 2021 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.


Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Day 13 ~ “Tricube Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth


Well, I’m always on the lookout for poetry forms that are new, even to me. I happened across this one last year and it was so fun that I'm going to share it again, on Day 13, using all the same examples, etc. 

Let’s see what you've got this year, especially our newbies.

Give it a try!! Oh my!!

It’s called a TRICUBE and the premise is 3 + 3 + 3 =

Three stanzas

Three lines each

Three syllables per line

RHYMING DOES NOT MATTER . . . but watching your syllables does!! So COUNT THEM OUT!! Three syllables per line!

 



   

How hard can that be? You might be surprised. Here are a few I came up with but I’m expecting better offerings from all of you! Cheers!!

 


A new day
Rising sun
Hope eternal

 

List of chores
I’ll get done
Later on
 
Nightfall comes
Chores not done
Not surprised
 

~~~~~~~

 
Baby boy
Toothless grin
Wants grandma

 

Hug my boy
Here’s a toy
What a joy
 
Baby boy
Cries nonstop
Go see mom

 

~~~~~~~

 
My kitten
Heart smitten
‘Til bitten

 











Mean ol’ cat
What a brat
None of that
 
Sad kitty
Not guilty
Still picky

 

For what they are worth – all of these silly little examples are nevertheless, copyrighted by me:                                                 

        © 2020 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.