Monday, April 22, 2019

Day 22 – “If-You-Were” Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



This is a fun little poetry form called “If-You-Were

This is actually a quatrain (4 lines) in which the last sound of lines 2 and 4 rhyme, giving it the following rhyming pattern: a•b•c•b.

But no required meter – no counting syllables. J

It also has two metaphors (remember, a “metaphor” is a "figure of speech" in which a term or phrase is applied to something which is not literally applicable in order to draw a comparison).

A metaphor is NOT the same as a simile. A simile uses the word like or as in order to make a comparison, whereas metaphors use is or are. So if you say “If I were” or “If you were” and name a thing (noun), it is a metaphor.

A sample sentence using a simile:
            Your hair is like golden flax.

Here is basically the same sentence but used as a metaphor:
            Your hair is golden flax.

So, there’s a little grammar lesson for ya’ – sorry, it’s the teacher in me.

OK, back to the instructions

Line 1: start with: “If you were” and then add a metaphor.

Line 2: start with “And I were" and then add your second metaphor.

Lines 3 & 4 ~ tell something you could do together and make sure that line 4 rhymes with line 2. That's it! Simple!

I learned about this little poetic form created by Charles Ghinga by perusing his site. Here is what he has to say about it (taken from his “Father Goose Blog” with his permission) ~ "How to Write a Poem" ~ you need to scroll down until to get to this poetry form: 

          “I created the If-You-Were poem many years ago to help introduce children to the  
         magic of metaphor. The If-You-Were poem is simple and fun. It invites you to  
         compare yourself to something and to compare your friend to something else.”

And if you go to his page, you can find three more example poems, as well as several other fun and simple poetry forms for all ages, especially children. 

Examples:

If you were a flower blossom
And I were a bumble bee,
I’d drink of your nectar
And make honey, you see.
                        © 2019 Stephanie Abney


















If you were a candle
And I were a match,
I’d light your wick brightly
And some shadows we’d catch.
                        © 2001 Stephanie Abney


Yeah, these are both pretty lame. I can’t wait to read your far better examples! Have fun! Cheers!!

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo credit: Thomas Schiewer at Pixabay (flower & bee)

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Day 21 ~ “Free Verse Poems” for Easter and “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth



So, today is Easter. Let’s just abandon all the rules (as some of you fabulous poets out there prefer to do anyway) and write a free verse poem about Easter or anything you choose. I just want to point out that “free verse” is NOT the same thing as “blank verse.”

Blank verse IS unrhymed but surprisingly, it DOES have rules - rules that pertain to things like “iambic pentameter” with unstressed/stressed syllable patterns or “trochee” with stressed/unstressed or even more craziness, how about dactyl blank verse with has stressed/unstressed/unstressed syllable patterns? There is also “anapest blank verse” – yeah, we’ll just stop there. So, we are not writing blank verse today ~ just free verse. And if nothing strikes your fancy – just use a favorite poetry form that we have used earlier this month.

FREE VERSE is basically random, without any fixed metrical patterns of any kind and while there is no need to rhyme, it’s totally fine if you wish to use rhyme, but there is no need to count syllables or to worry about much of anything – just let it come. But free verse is actually tricky to make it feel cohesive, but once you get it just how you want it – you will be most happy with it. Free verse poems can be long, short or anything in between, as long as it seems to have a good flow, then you are good to go.

Nature, family, life, love, religion, Easter, whatever comes to mind ~ go for it.
So, for examples today I’m sharing two free verse poems that I wrote a few years back. I wrote “Hope” in 2015 and have shared it every year since because I love it and for today, it works well for Easter. The second poem, “Dishwater Redemption” was first written in the mid-1970s when I had young children but I rewrote it a bit in 2007. Anyway, for what it’s worth, here are two free verse poems:

HOPE 

Hope creates options.
It still can happen.
In fact, anything CAN happen.
Hope is what we cling to.
I hope I am doing enough.
I hope people understand the purity of my motives.
I hope my family will all be together in the hereafter.

Why do I have hope?
Because I believe what Christ said when He came.
I believe He really did die for our sins and that
through the atonement of Christ
and the power of the resurrection;
I can be raised up unto life eternal with my loved ones.
That is what I hope for.

And because I have hope
. . . I keep trying.

© 2015 Stephanie Abney



Dishwater Redemption

The house is quiet.
My husband and children are asleep.
The silence of the room is interrupted
Only by the sounds I make while washing the dishes.

As I pick up each dish and rinse away our dinner,
I am reminded of the meal we enjoyed together.
The chatter of the children as they spoke of their day
Lingers in my mind and I feel a sweet contentment.

I’m nearly done when I notice my well-used cookie sheet,
Standing at the back of the dish drainer;
Even though I have washed it thoroughly,
It really doesn’t look very clean.

The evidence of so many batches of cookies baked
Over and over again until it looks tarnished and brown.
When it was new, it sparkled and shined.
Now it is discolored and scratched.

And for some reason, tonight, this bothers me.
I take the cookie sheet from its resting place and
Plunge it back into the warm, soapy water.
But I am unable to rid it of the baked-on grime.

I reach in the cupboard for an S.O.S. scouring pad
And go after the suspect brown specks with renewed vigor.
I pay special attention to the inside corners of the cookie sheet.
This proves to be especially satisfying and I continue until it shines.

It has been reborn and I can see my reflection in it.
And suddenly, I realize… I am like the cookie sheet.
I’m not dirty by any means, but perhaps,
Not quite clean enough either; I have lost some of my sparkle.

Leaning against the sink I know what I must do.
I will take upon me the S.O.S. scouring pad of repentance
And work and pray hard to be shiny and clean,
Until the Savior’s image shows in my countenance.

I plan to keep my cookie sheet as bright as it looks today
And with a few repairs here and there, and a heart full of love,
I can do the same for myself, that I might be more useful
To those I share this earthly space with.

Who knew? Sometimes, there’s not much difference between
A neglected ol’ cookie sheet and a life too busy to notice
Some of the sparkle and shine has faded.
Yes, S.O.S. pads are a beautiful thing.

                                 ~ © Stephanie Abney 2007


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo credit: Myriam at Pixabay (hands)

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Day 20 ~ Acrostic and/or ABC Poem for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth ”



Most people have heard about and even written an “acrostic” poem. It’s a rather simple pattern and can be quite fun to do. You can choose any word to be your base – a word or name that you write down the left-hand side of your paper, one letter under another. See farther down below to also get the “skinny” on ABC poems.

And PLEASE keep reading to the end if you have never heard my poetry story about Fiona and the Snake Poem from when I was teaching English in China ~ super cute. Just sayin’

SO, it only takes a few steps to get started with an ACROSTIC POEM ~

1. Choose a name or the object of your poem.
2. Write that name or that word down the left-hand side of
your paper vertically, generally using all capital letters.
3. Start each sentence of your poem with the capital letter on that line.
4. No need to worry about rhyming or counting syllables or anything.
5. Each line can be whatever length you choose, from one word to a longer sentence.

Example

One word/line acrostic for the name “Susan” (Yes, I know this is a lame example, but it’s just an example. I know you can do better):

Super
Unique
Sweet
Understanding
Nice 

Or, use the first letter as the beginning of a sentence instead of a single word.

ABC Poems are basically the same thing EXCEPT it is a TWENTY-SIX line poem where every line starts with the next letter of the alphabet, in order. Every example I have seen, the word (or a tense of the word) EXCEPT has been used for the letter “X” (up to you, but it’s a common choice for the line that “starts with the letter X”

In 2016 I went to China to teach English at an “English Camp” during their winter break. I have shared this before but I really can’t let this poetry form pass without sharing this delightful experience once again. I had a 14-year-old student named “Fiona.” I explained how to write an acrostic poem and suggested to the students that they choose a favorite animal for their poem. I gave additional details and then they got busy.

Soon they were showing me their poems. They did a wonderful job. Then Fiona turned in her poem:

Snow is falling down.
No one wants to stay outside.
A little girl stands at my front door.
Knocks it with a little cry.
Early afternoon, she falls asleep in my room.

I read it and told it that it was a lovely poem but it had nothing to do with a snake. She replied, “But I wrote ‘snake’ down the left-hand side.”
So I explained that the poem also needed to be ABOUT a snake if that was the word she chose. She said, “Okay,” took the paper back, added a few words and turned it back in…

Here is what she added to that last line of “Early afternoon, she falls asleep in my room … and then she turned into a snake.”



I loved it!! Love her!! I laughed so hard. It is a cherished memory. And now, you can enjoy it too. Cheers!!

Whatcha’ got?

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo credit - Pixabay

Friday, April 19, 2019

Day 19 ~ Rhyme Royal Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



Okay – I actually wanted to introduce 7-lined poems which are called “septets.”

A septet can be a poem of any form or meter as long as it has seven lines. 

But before you rush off to do that – let’s explore a SPECIFIC type of septet: a RHYME ROYAL. This is actually the most common form of septet poetry and the only 7-lined poem to have its own special name.

A Rhyme Royal was popularized by Geoffrey Chaucer and it began to be called “royal” because James I of Scotland used it for his own verses.

It has VERY SPECIFIC guidelines, which are:

SEVEN LINES, each having EXACTLY TEN SYLLABLES in them.

There is also a SPECIFIC rhyming PATTERN: a·b·a·b·b·c·c

An example can be found in William Wordsworth poem, “Resolution and Independence.”


So your topic can be anything as long as the poem is 7 lines long and each line has 10 syllables in it and the ending rhymes follow the pattern a·b·a·b·b·c·c

And it that makes you crazy, just write any ol’ septet, which a seven-lined poem of any form you choose, included free verse.

Here is my example:


Being with my family is the best.
Laughing, crying, and playing together.
We have such fun when we are on quest.
Loving and supporting one another.
Father and mother, sister and brother.
Families can be eternally bound.
This is the way true happiness is found.
    
                                     © 2019 Stephanie Abney

And here I have broken it down by lines and ending rhymes:

1. Being with my family is the best. A
2. Laughing, crying, and playing together. B
3. We have such fun when we are on quest. A
4. Loving and supporting one another. B
5. Father and mother, sister and brother. B
6. Families can be eternally bound. C
7. This is the way true happiness is found. C

Okay, YOUR TURN!! Cheers!!


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Photo credit: kai kalhh at Pixabay (family silhouette)



Thursday, April 18, 2019

Day 18 ~ National Poem in Your Pocket Day for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"


~ Poem in You Pocket Day ~

"Poem in Your Pocket Day 2019" is on April 18 and is part of National Poetry Month. On this day, select a poem, carry it with you, and share it with others at schools, bookstores, libraries, parks, workplaces, street corners, and on social media using the hashtag #pocketpoem
"Poem in Your Pocket Day" was initiated in April 2002 by the Office of the Mayor in New York City, in partnership with the city’s Departments of Cultural Affairs and Education. In 2008, the Academy of American Poets took the initiative to all fifty United States, encouraging individuals around the country to participate. In 2016, the League of Canadian Poets extended Poem in Your Pocket Day to Canada.
Above clipped directly from: poets.org
You can find it here and even find a 62 page downloadable PDF of a free guide for celebrating "Poem in Your Pocket Day" in your school, community, or business. It has pages and pages of suggested poems to use.
OR, I like the idea of carrying around one of your own poems and sharing it with others today
So, there really isn't a poetry form to follow today! Just enjoy poetry in any way you wish and if writing more poetry is one of the ways you want to celebrate it, then please do so - any poetic form we have gone over or any you wish to look up or better yet, here's a day to write some free verse poetry. It's all up to you. Cheers!!
Photo credit: "congerdesign" at Pixabay

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Day 17 - Haiku & Poiku poetic forms


FOR DAY 17: OK, it's after midnight but I am BEAT - so I'm going to write and post Wednesday's challenge a bit later on today -

HOWEVER, it IS "International Haiku Day" so feel free to write some Haikus which I was going to feature and ADD a bit on how to write a "Pop Haiku" otherwise known as a "Poiku" ~ if you need to get started earlier than when I get the post up, y'all should know how to write a Haiku (3 lines with a syllable count of 5, 7, 5). And if you want to try a POIKU - use the link below

Head on over and get started if you want and I'll join you later with an actual blog post about both Haiku AND Poiku poetic forms. Talk to you later ~

Poiku: Create A Pop Haiku


Image credit: digital creation by "Candice Candice" at Pixabay

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Day 16 ~ Windspark Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



This is a rather simple little 5-line poem with very specific guidelines. Its simplicity is its beauty. This is also an easy and fun poetic form to use with children

Line 1 ~ “I dreamed” (that’s it – just write I dreamed and do not add anything)
Line 2 ~ “I was a/the _______” (you fill in the blank, generally a one-word noun)
Line 3 ~ where/location (keep it short: in theon aat the …) wherever
Line 4 ~ action (use an “ing” verb with just a few more words to describe the action)
Line 5 ~ adverb (use only ONE word – an adverb with a “ly” ending)

Here are three examples I came up with today:

I dreamed
I was the sun
High in the sky
Watching over the world
Regally

            © 2019 Stephanie Abney


I dreamed
I was a butterfly
In a garden
Dancing in the wind
Gracefully

            © 2019 Stephanie Abney
  



I dreamed
I was a child
In my mother’s womb
Waiting to arrive
Anxiously

            © 2019 Stephanie Abney

Okay, your turn!! Whatcha’ got?

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Photo credit: David Mark at Pixabay


Monday, April 15, 2019

Day 15 ~ Tyburn Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



OK, hold onto your hats!! Woozier! This is beyond tricky, but I think y’all can have lots of fun with it. I had not tried this before writing this post and so I’ve never shared it as part of poetry month. (OH, and if this discourages you – that is NOT my desire – just write any poem you choose and COME BACK TOMORROW and see if you like it better). I do hope a bunch of you will try this one though. It really stretches your skills as poets and writers (and thinkers). So . . .

Tyburn poems are deceiving in that to look at a completed poem, it appears simple enough. Yeah, right! But it was a good exercise. I’ve tried to explain it step by step and even created a little chart to help you out. Plus there are a couple of websites that help with description and rhyming that I think you will find useful.

Here we go:

We are back to counting syllables and lines. This is a SIX-LINE poem and the first 4 lines are EACH a SINGLE DESCRIPTIVE WORD with TWO SYLLABLES, that all RHYME and make sense together. Phew!! We’re not done . . .

The last two lines (5 & 6) are EACH NINE SYLLABLES LONG, and Line 5 incorporates the first two of the words of the poem while Line 6 incorporates the next two of the words of the poem IN A SPECIFIC PLACE.

Line 5 will have 4 syllables (any word count, just FOUR syllables) and then the repeated words from lines 1 and 2 and then Line 6 has 4 syllables (any word count, just FOUR syllables) and then the repeated words from lines 3 and 4 . . . AND then each line ENDS with just ONE word – with only ONE syllable and they have to rhyme with each other (but do not need to rhyme with lines 1-4).

So, if you choose a word that ends in “y” to start off your poem – they will all probably need to end in “y” and if you choose an “ing” ending word, then they will all need to end with “ing” (that’s just for lines 1-4). Better look at the examples AND the chart!
I know you can do it!! Cheers!!

Here is an example I found on the web – it’s rather lite-hearted and cute:

PEANUT BUTTER
Nutty,
Sticky,
Crunchy,
Tasty,
Peanut butter, nutty, sticky spread
With jellied bread, crunchy, tasty fed


                                                                           Copyright © 2016 Charles Sides   

Handy little site to find some “Describing Words” https://describingwords.io/ ~ just plug the word you want to describe and then click the search button.

This site not only helps you find rhyming words, but it separates them into 1 syllable words, 2 syllable words, etc. https://www.rhymer.com/ - RHYMER


Okay, here is my first one:

Poetry

Lyric
Cryptic
Magic
Epic
Poetry month, lyric, cryptic, jots
Share emotions, magic, epic thoughts

                                  © 2019 Stephanie Abney



Below the chart I show, step-by-step, my thought process in writing one of my examples:

Hope this little chart that I created proves helpful ~
# of syllables per line
Rhyming pattern
Meter & where to repeat words
Hints of what should be used per line
2
A
aa
One word adjective with 2 syllables
2
A
bb
Different one word adjective with 2 syllables
2
A
cc
Different one word adjective with 2 syllables
2
A
dd
Different one word adjective with 2 syllables
9
B
xxxxaabbB
Any four syllables then aa, bb, single syllable word
9
B
xxxxccddB
Any four syllables then cc, dd, single syllable word
       Tyburn Poetic Form Chart © 2019 Stephanie Abney


Here is my second one:

Satan

Cunning
Lying
Cheating
Tempting
Heartless trickster, cunning, lying, doled
Flattering lies, cheating, sneaking, cold

                                    © 2019 Stephanie Abney

How I tried to figure it out: So, first I made a list of some adjectives (“ing” words) – more than I needed and then another list that could be used in lines 5 & 6 – then I started playing around with it, crossed off the words I didn’t want to use, which left me with 4 descriptive words and then I created lines 5 & 6, incorporating the words from lines 1 & 2 and lines 3 & 4, respectively:

Satan
Cunning
Charming
Lying
Raging
Cheating
Sneaking
Tempting

Words to possibly use in lines 5 & 6: Crafty, jealous, avenging, heartless, destructive, destroy, destroying, bitter, conniving, flatter, flattery, cowardly, trickster, tricking, tricky, malicious, deceitful, cold, sneaky, creepy, creep, reap, reaper, damned, persistent, tenacious, dangerous, rob, steal, louse, angry, anger

And I posted the finished product from this effort just under the chart.

READY? Go try this one out!! Cheers!!

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Image credit: Clker-Free-Vector-Images at Pixabay (Satan)
Photo credit: Cromaconceptovisual at Pixabay (poetry book)