Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Day 13 ~ “Tricube Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth


Well, I’m always on the lookout for poetry forms that are new, even to me. I happened across this one last year and it was so fun that I'm going to share it again, on Day 13, using all the same examples, etc. 

Let’s see what you've got this year, especially our newbies.

Give it a try!! Oh my!!

It’s called a TRICUBE and the premise is 3 + 3 + 3 =

Three stanzas

Three lines each

Three syllables per line

RHYMING DOES NOT MATTER . . . but watching your syllables does!! So COUNT THEM OUT!! Three syllables per line!

 



   

How hard can that be? You might be surprised. Here are a few I came up with but I’m expecting better offerings from all of you! Cheers!!

 


A new day
Rising sun
Hope eternal

 

List of chores
I’ll get done
Later on
 
Nightfall comes
Chores not done
Not surprised
 

~~~~~~~

 
Baby boy
Toothless grin
Wants grandma

 

Hug my boy
Here’s a toy
What a joy
 
Baby boy
Cries nonstop
Go see mom

 

~~~~~~~

 
My kitten
Heart smitten
‘Til bitten

 











Mean ol’ cat
What a brat
None of that
 
Sad kitty
Not guilty
Still picky

 

For what they are worth – all of these silly little examples are nevertheless, copyrighted by me:                                                 

        © 2020 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Day 12 ~ “Brevette Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

 

Well, it’s been a busy couple of weeks and now most of you are up and looking for today’s poetry form to follow ~ so I’m just going to copy this one almost exactly from the last time I used it, (which was last year – HaHa), which means I haven’t written anything new this year for this format, but I’ll see how my day goes; hopefully, I can join you, but it’s FUN, short, and surprisingly challenging!! FOLLOW ALL DIRECTIONS, including adding spaces only on the VERB. Better check out “How to write a Brevette Poem

So this LOOKS simple – THREE WORDS? Yeah, but it can be tricky ~ The Brevette ~ check it out!! It will be tricky for me because I struggle with brevity! No titles or anything

ONLY THREE WORDS? Yikes!!

There are a FEW particulars to this poetry form created by Emily Romano. Here’s a little grammar for you – I know you love it – this poem consists of TWO NOUNS & a VERB (it can have a title or not - up to you):

LINE 1: a subject (noun)

LINE 2: a verb (the verb has a space between each letter:  v e r b)

LINE 3: an object (noun)

They need to STAY in that exact order and yeah, there is ONE MORE THING!! In order for the verb to show an ongoing action, it is spaced out, letter by letter.

Whether or not you include a title is up to you, but otherwise, there is NO punctuation, and all words are lower case ~

THREE WORDSdon’t be adding “helping verbs” or “articles” – that’s cheating. Coming up with a subject and an object for the nouns is surprisingly difficult. Seriously, this is trickier than it seems. So, here are a couple of examples, some better than others:


Example #1: (no title)

rainbow

r a d i a t e s

spectrum

1      © 2007 Emily Romano


 


Example #2:

“Never Give Up”

dreams

c o m e

true

© 2018 Stephanie Abney





Example #3:

“On the run”

dog

s m e l l s

escapes

      © 2017 Stephanie Abney



Example #4:

“Knotted Strings”

patience

u n t a n g l e s

knots

© 2018 Stephanie Abney


 

 

Example #5:

“Crying”

eyes

l e a k

tears

      © 2017 Stephanie Abney

 


Example #6:

“Keep believing”

dreams

f o l l o w

passion

      © 2017 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

 

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Sunday, April 11, 2021

DAY 11 ~ "Color Poem" for “30 Poems in 30 Days" #NationalPoetryMonth


Can you believe we are already a THIRD of the way through Poetry Month? We have had fun with our new friends joining us this year but we are really missing some people from years past. I think it’s just been such a crazy year that not everyone is able to join us this time. But let your friends that have joined us in the past know that we miss them and they can jump in any time!!

So, Sundays are usually busy with family and worship so I thought we would do this simple little poetry form today. Let’s write a “COLOR POEM.”

There are actually several ways to write a color poem if you care to Google it but for our purposes, we are going to follow this one. It’s sweet and simple. I like it because it has a metaphor and three similes and y’all know I am partial to using parts of speech when writing poetry. (It’s the teacher and grammar nerd in me). So here goes:

This poem is just four lines. So short and simple perhaps you will want to do several color poems using a different color each time.

REMEMBER:

A “metaphor” uses the word is. It’s a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to draw a comparison. It is not the same as a simile.

A simile uses the word like or as in order to make a comparison, whereas metaphors use is or are. So if you say “If I were” or “If you were” and named the thing (noun), it is a metaphor.

A metaphor: Your hair is golden flax.

A simile: Your hair is like golden flax.

Here is the pattern for our color poem:

Line 1: metaphor ~ what “feeling” does this color give you – call it that

Line 2: simile ~ example using a simile

Line 3: simile ~ another example using a simile

Line 4: simile ~ final example using a simile


And that’s as easy as it gets!!

 

And here is a VERY simple sample (did you like that little “alliteration?) from a few years ago:

 

Blue is peace.

Like the end of a perfect day,

Like the smile of a newborn,

As comforting as a downy quilt.

© 2017 Stephanie Abney

 

Wrote this one today:

 







Pink is happiness.

Like a giggling, happy toddler,

Like cotton candy at the fair,

As joyful as a puppy wagging its tail, just because you are near.

© 2021 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

 

Image by Sally Wynn from Pixabay 

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Day 10 ~ Windspark Poem for "30 poems in 30 days" #NationalPoetryMonth


Well, how about an easy one for your busy Saturday? (Yes, I have heard some grumbling about some forms being too hard or taking too long). But, be advised - I have harder ones yet in store. But for today - this is quick and simple. Enjoy!!!

This is a rather simple little 5-line poem with very specific guidelines. Its simplicity is its beauty. This is also an easy and fun poetic form to use with children.

Line 1 ~ “I dreamed” (that’s it – just write I dreamed and do not add anything)

Line 2 ~ “I was a/the _______” (you fill in the blank, generally a one-word noun)

Line 3 ~ where/location (keep it short: in theon aat the …) wherever

Line 4 ~ action (use an “ing” verb with just a few more words to describe the action)

Line 5 ~ adverb (use only ONE word – an adverb with a “ly” ending)

Here are a couple of examples I came up with a few years ago.


 

I dreamed
I was a butterfly
In a garden
Dancing in the wind
Gracefully

             © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 



I dreamed
I was the sun
High in the sky
Watching over the world
Regally

 

            © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

 

Okay, your turn!! Whatcha’ got?

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Photo credit: David Mark at Pixabay

Friday, April 9, 2021

Day 9 ~ Rhyme Royal Poem for "30 poems in 30 days" #NationalPoetryMonth


Y’all are doing great so far!! Today we will explore7-lined poems called “septets.” A septet can be a poem of any form or meter as long as it has seven lines. But before you rush off to do that – let’s explore a SPECIFIC type of septet: a RHYME ROYAL. This is actually the most common form of septet poetry and the only 7-lined poem to have its own special name.

A Rhyme Royal was popularized by Geoffrey Chaucer and it began to be called “royal” because James I of Scotland used it for his own verses.

It has VERY SPECIFIC guidelines, which are:

SEVEN LINES, each having EXACTLY TEN SYLLABLES in them.

There is also a SPECIFIC rhyming PATTERN: a·b·a·b·b·c·c

An example can be found in William Wordsworth poem, “Resolution and Independence”

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45545/resolution-and-independence

So your topic can be anything as long as the poem is 7 lines long and each line has 10 syllables in it and the ending rhymes follow the pattern a·b·a·b·b·c·c

And if that makes you crazy, just write any ol’ septet, which a seven-lined poem of any form you choose, included free verse.

Here is my example of a Rhyme:Royal Poem:











Being with my family is the best.
Laughing, crying, and playing together.
We have such fun when we are on quest.
Loving and supporting one another.
Father and mother, sister and brother.
Families can be eternally bound.
This is the way true happiness is found.

                                    © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

And here I have broken it down by lines and ending rhymes:

 

1. Being with my family is the best. A
2. Laughing, crying, and playing together. B
3. We have such fun when we are on quest. A
4. Loving and supporting one another. B
5. Father and mother, sister and brother. B
6. Families can be eternally bound. C
7.
This is the way true happiness is found. C

Okay, YOUR TURN!! Cheers!!

 

 PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Day 8 ~ “Octopoem” for #NationalPoetryMonth “30 Poems in 30 Days”


Welcome to Day 8 of our annual poetry challenge: 30 poems in 30 days!! I have a really hard time NOT using this poem for Day 8 simply because it’s perfect for Day 8: this fun little poem that has 8 lines. It’s called an “Octopoem.” It’s really easy to write:

Pick a topic of your choice and describe it in EIGHT lines. Each line can be as long as you choose and does not need to rhyme or anything of that nature.

HOWEVER, the only thing you DO need to follow is the order of the descriptions you use for each of the 8 lines about your poem.

An octopoem has 8 lines describing the topic (or pet or person, whatever):

line 1: color
line 2: season
line 3: place
line 4: weather
line 5: clothing
line 6: furniture
line 7: TV show
line 8: food


Here are a couple of examples I have written in the past ~




He’s just a good ol’ boy ~ my Jim

His eyes are blue and they twinkle.
Any season that is warm makes him happy.
He loves to be anywhere that his family is nearby.
He’s an Arizona boy because he likes it hot.
He’s not a fussy dresser – in fact, I struggle to get him to buy new clothes.
Our rocking chair is his favorite place to sit, but lying on the couch is a close second.
Any TV show is fine, because he’s going to be asleep soon anyway!
He’s not a food snob. The man will eat almost anything I offer.

 

© 2018 Stephanie Abney






My Grandson, My Friend

His favorite color is green.
He is a breath of fresh Spring air.
He loves to be wherever I am.
We love to play in the rain.
If it's green, it's clean and ready to wear.
When I can't find him he's usually hiding behind a chair.
If “Wild Kratts” is on, we are good to go.
He likes to eat everything as long as it is a peanut butter sandwich.

© 2015 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

 

 

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Day 7 ~ Japanese Dodoitsu Poem for "30 poems in 30 days" #NationalPoetryMonth


I first introduced this poetry form to this challenge last year. Did I mention that this is the NINTH year I have run this poetry challenge? Pretty cool, right? Anyway, I digress . . . back to today’s poem:

Like many Japanese poetry styles, this one focuses on counting syllables – but not the same three lines of 5,7,5 syllables as the Haiku. 

This one is DIFFERENT ~ We are going to write a DODOITSU poem today. Fun times!!!

Here’s a bit of background: Dodoitsu poems appeared around the late 1860s. They were favored by working-class citizens. The name’s translation is basically, “quickly, city to city.” Some say that it refers to the ease with which they were passed along. The Dodoitsu has even been called the “Japanese limerick” as most revolved around love, work, and daily life, from a humorous perspective; so as a general rule, they did not explore deep thoughts. But rather, they were used as a way to record those off-the-wall funny moments in one’s day. 

I have a dear friend who writes AT LEAST a poem a day and includes her poems in her journal as they usually reflect her day. See what you come up with.
 

Here is the format:

FOUR LINES: (only counting syllables – no rhyming required, nor excluded . . . just whatever).


The first 3 lines ALL HAVE SEVEN SYLLABLES.

And the 4th line has FIVE SYLLABLES.

 

That’s it ~ simple, right? Yeah, that’s what I thought. You give it a try. Write as many as suits your fancy today.

 

More to do than I have time
Still, I write this little rhyme
A moment here, moment there
Need a cherry coke!

                © 2021 Stephanie Abney

 


Taught the boys to do some math
They groaned about it too much
So now they have to shout out:
We love math! Love math!

                © 2021 Stephanie Abney











 

I love my grandkids so much
They are so entertaining
They melt my heart with a smile
Yes, come stay a while

                © 2021 Stephanie Abney

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Day 6 ~ Pyramid Poem for "30 poems in 30 days" #NationalPoetryMonth

 

OK, today we are going to write a “Pyramid Poem.” This is quite simple, if you follow the rules ~ it’s one of those “parts of speech” poems, (great for classroom teachers and homeschoolers). It has some repetition in it, which is part of its charm. It’s a fun one where each line builds off of the previous line as certain words are intentionally carried over.

When all is said and done – if you center the words (which I realize you can’t do in the comment section here or on a FB post) – but when you save it for yourself or post it on your own blog, center the words so the poem is in the shape of a pyramid. It’s a fun little poem . . . so let’s begin:

Here is the format ~ one word for part of speech indicated on each line BUT THE CATCH IS ~ once you have selected a word for NOUN – that same word needs to be used EVERY time a NOUN is called for in the poem, same for the adjective you choose and so forth. Syllable counts, word counts and rhyming are not specific or a requirement, although some may occur, BUT using the same word for a particular part of speech IS a requirement.

Here is the pattern:

Line 1: noun
Line 2: adjective, noun
Line 3: adjective, noun, verb
Line 4: adjective, noun, verb, adverb
Line 5: adjective, noun, verb, adverb, prepositional phrase

Now, if you are not up to speed on all the parts of speech – be sure to read the review that pertains to the following example (I’ll post it right after the poem):  

I found an easy-to-follow example online at www.scholastic.com/ but no author credit was given:

 

 


Clouds
Puffy clouds
Puffy clouds float
Puffy clouds float sleepily
Puffy clouds float sleepily across the horizon



Noun: names a person, place, thing, or idea (clouds)
Adjective: a word that describes a noun (puffy)
Verb: an action (float)
Adverb: a word that tells how (sleepily)
Prepositional Phrase: a group of words that tells where something is or
where something is happening (across the horizon)

 

And if you need more info on prepositions and prepositional phrases – you will need to just do an Internet search and get some help on it. Cheers!!

 

And here’s an example I wrote a few years ago:


Children
Sweet children
Sweet children play
Sweet children play happily
Sweet children play happily at Grandma’s house

                                                                                        © 2015 Stephanie Abney

 

And here’s one I wrote this morning after NOT being able to prepare this post last night before I went to bed! The Internet locked me out and wouldn’t reset until a few hours later. Dang!!

 

Internet
Fickle Internet
Fickle Internet disappears
Fickle Internet disappears suddenly
Fickle Internet disappears suddenly during poetry month!

                                                                                      © 2021 Stephanie Abney


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

 

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Day 5 ~ “5 W’s Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

 

Wow!! The poems written for Easter Sunday were beautiful. Thanks for sharing your talents. (For those reading this blog and thinking the few shared in the comments are the only ones – we have a private FB group where so many wonderful poems are shared each day – BUT, you must contact me and ask to join it). Thanks.

So, for Day 5 why don’t we tackle a handy little poem that can be surprisingly delightful? It’s called the 5 W’s Poem.

This is an obvious poem.  It can be sweet, silly, or serious, depending on what you fill in. This poem answers the 5 W’s: Who, What, Where, When & Why.

These poems have no need to rhyme, nor are the lines any particular length or meter. So, it’s a pretty simple poetry form to follow:

Line 1: Who (or what) is the poem about?
Line 2: What action is happening?
Line 3: Where does the action take place?
Line 4: When does the action take place?
Line 5: Why does this action happen?

Here are some quick examples I came up with a number of years ago and a couple from others (shared with permission). Cheers!!

 

Jim, my eternal companion
Takes good care of me,
Wherever we are,
At each opportunity,
Because he loves me

           © 2014 Stephanie Abney

 



The fat green frog
lunged deep
into the smooth blue pond
during the silence of the morning
to avoid the probing beak of the hungry Blue Heron

           © 2018 Deborah Royal


A group of teenagers
Making videos of being silly,
At the local park,
During spring break,
Hoping to be the next YouTube wonder.

           © 2014 Stephanie Abney

  

Our loving Heavenly Father
Prepared a plan of Happiness,
In the heavens,
Before the world was,
So we could return and live with Him.

           © 2014 Stephanie Abney



My children
Laughing, wrestling, creating
Tumble through the living room
Every day after school
Because they feel safe and loved

                   © 2017 Kaci Carlson

 

 

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

 

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.