Friday, April 12, 2024

Day 12 2024 ~ How to write a “Windspark Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days

Yay for Poetry Month!! Y’all are doing great! How about an easy, fun one today?

This is a rather simple little 5-line poem with very specific guidelines. Its simplicity is its beauty. This is also a great poetic form to use with children.

Line 1 ~ “I dreamed” (that’s it – just write I dreamed and do not add anything)

Line 2 ~ “I was a/the _______” (you fill in the blank, generally a one-word noun)

Line 3 ~ where/location (keep it short: in theon aat the …) wherever

Line 4 ~ action (use an “ing” verb with just a few more words to describe the action)

Line 5 ~ adverb (use only ONE word – an adverb with a “ly” ending)

Here are a couple of examples I came up with a few years ago.

 

 

I dreamed
I was a butterfly
In a garden
Dancing in the wind
Gracefully

 

            © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

(Image by Paul Brennan from Pixabay)

 

I dreamed

I was the sun

High in the sky

Watching over the world

Regally

 

         © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

 

Okay, your turn!! Whatcha’ got?

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Thursday, April 11, 2024

Day 11 2024 ~ How to write a “Eleven Line Autobiographical Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days”

Well, nice job stretching the truth yesterday with your hyperbole poems! Fun stuff! So for today, let’s TELL the truth in an 11-line autobiographical poem. Today is Day 11 so we will write an 11-line poem.

This one is pretty easy ~ it’s a “fill in the blanks” style poem. It’s also a chance to let people know a bit more about you. However, if doing that publicly makes you uncomfortable, you can always use a fictional character’s traits to fill in the blanks . . . and create a poem that way, particularly if you are a writer; you can create a poem about one of your characters. Either way, it’s just one more poetic form to explore.

I hope y’all are having a great time so far for #NationalPoetryMonth !!

Here’s how to do this poem:

Just fill in the blanks and then go back and delete everything that is underlined with a yellow highlight, center what’s left, and you have your autobiographical poem. Cheers!!


“Eleven Line Autobiographical Poem”

line 1 Your first name

line 2 Four character traits

line 3 Sibling of

line 4 Lover of

line 5 Who feels

line 6 Who needs

line 7 Who gives

line 8 Who fears

line 9 Who would like to see

line 10 Resident of

line 11 Your last name

 

Here’s one I wrote a few years ago – first I filled in the blanks and then I deleted the parts underlined/highlighted in yellow and then I centered the poem. Cheers!!

line 1  Stephanie

line 2 Compassionate, creative, joyful, grateful

line 3 Sibling of Camille

line 4 Lover of life, family, country and the Lord

line 5 Who feels happiest surrounded by family

line 6 Who needs love and understanding

line 7 Who gives freely of herself to help where she’s needed

line 8 Who fears she may not have done enough

line 9 Who would like to see everyone treated with kindness

line 10 Resident of the universe

line 11 Abney

 



Stephanie

Compassionate, creative, joyful, grateful

Sibling of Camille

Lover of life, family, country and the Lord

Who feels happiest surrounded by family

Who needs love and understanding

Who gives freely of herself to help where she’s needed

Who fears she may not have done enough

Who would like to see everyone treated with kindness

Resident of the universe

Abney

 

                                      © Stephanie Abney 2020

Your turn!! Cheers!!

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Wednesday, April 10, 2024

Day 10 2024 ~ How to write a “Hyperbole Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days”

Great job on the Nonet poems yesterday!! Cheers!!

I really, really, really love the word “hyperbole.” I just like the way it sounds. And when used in poetry, it can be the cause of more fun than a life-long pass to Disneyland. (THAT was a hyperbole, by the way).

Hyperbole Poems are written in overstated, figurative language. They are full of very large exaggerations, often used for emphasis. A hyperbole is a figure of speech and a type of irony that uses extreme exaggeration for emphasis or to make a point. [Irony: the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning]. Such statements are exaggerations, but are not metaphors.

Obviously, hyperboles are not intended to be taken literally: “I’ve been waiting for an eternity for you to get here.”

Another case in point: “Hyperbole is the greatest thing in the history of the entire world!!!”

“I’ve told you a million times to …”

“She has a bazillion books.”

“I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.”

The 18th century poet, Robert Burns, used hyperbole in his poem, “A Red, Red Rose.” In the poem he exaggerates about the degree of love he feels for his beloved. He says that he’ll love his “bonnie lass” until the seas go dry, the sun melts rocks, and the sands of life come to an end.

Here’s a great example in an excerpt (1st verse) of a hyperbole poem, “I Ate a Spicy Pepper” by Kenn Nesbitt – who has an excellent site for teaching poetry to kids (or anyone else, for that matter).

I ate a spicy pepper
From my brother on a dare.
The pepper caught my head on fire
And burned off all my hair.

        It goes on with more examples of hyperbole – such as

My mouth erupted lava
And my tongue began to melt.
My ears were shooting jets of steam.

....

Well, you get the idea ~ there really are no special rules as to rhyme or rhythm with a hyperbole poem. You are the ruler of the world … of your poem, that is. (Threw in a little hyperbole for ya’).

So, what’s on your mind? Have fun with it!! S-T-R-E-T-C-H the truth and write a poem!!

Here’s a crazy little 4-line example I wrote a few years ago. What do the rest of you out there have to offer?











The little girl said she had a dog as big as a cow.

I thought that was odd and I asked her how.

She said the dog ate as much as a horse.

Well, I thought, that explains things, of course.

                                     

                                                © 2021 Stephanie Abney

 

YOUR TURN!!

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

 









Tuesday, April 9, 2024

Day 9 2024 ~ How to write a “Nonet Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days”

This is one of my all-time FAVORITE poetry forms: NONET POEM!! I use it every year. I hope you enjoy creating Nonet poems as well.

Basically, the “Nonet poem” is based on the number 9. So the 9th day is an obvious choice to share it. I first tried writing one of these for the 2014 Poetry Challenge and the two poems that resulted are two of my favorite and although I continue to use them as examples, I wrote a new one to go with a little painting I did last night – so it’s the first example. If you’ve been around for a while, you have seen the other two before. Either way, get set for lots of FUN!!!!!

A Nonet Poem is based on NINE, in more ways than one ~ it has nine lines and the FIRST LINE has NINE syllables ~ but there are a few more details to know. Here is how you do this poem:

When I looked up the word “nonet” in the dictionary I discovered it stood for 9 musical performers or 9 instruments – and the poem has a pattern that has 9 lines – first line has 9 syllables, each line thereafter has one less syllable, ending with the last line only having ONE syllable. The number of words does not matter, ONLY the number of syllables so it actually provides you with some flexibility. Intriguing, right?

Here is a “look” at this pattern:

* * * * * * * * * (9 syllables)
* * * * * * * * (8 syllables)
* * * * * * * (7 syllables)
* * * * * * (6 syllables)
* * * * * (5 syllables)
* * * * (4 syllables)
* * * (3 syllables)
* * (2 syllables)
* (1 syllable)

 

It can be about ANYTHING as long as the SYLLABLE COUNTS ARE CORRECT, so PLEASE count them so you can do it correctly.

 

Here is your handy, dandy online syllable counter:

 

This is my newest “Nonet” poem ~ true story – we really did dance at the end of the evening at our youth church meetings on Wednesday nights AND we really did have a working jukebox in the recreational hall. No charge.

 

  Back in the day when I was a teen

  We met at church on Wednesday nights

  After a lesson, we went

  To the cultural hall

  For twenty minutes

  Select some tunes

  We would dance

  Jukebox

  Fun!

                                                                                                             

                                                                                                            © 2024 Stephanie Abney

 

 

And here are the first two I ever wrote for this poetry form and they remain my favorites:


 






Made chocolate chip cookies tonight

One taste before I go to bed

One bite follows another

I forgot what I said

I’m ready to stop

Well, maybe not

Just one more

Then to . . .

Bed!!

          © 2014 Stephanie Abney

 










“Grandma, may we have a sleepover?”

My precious grandkids ask again.

“We promise to obey you.”

They give a hopeful look.

“We won’t talk in bed.”

That’s what they said.

“We love you.”

I said,

“Yes!”

           © 2014 Stephanie Abney

 

OKAY, your turn – GO!!

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

 

Monday, April 8, 2024

Day 8 2024 ~ How to write an “American 767” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"

Today we are going to learn how to write a poetry form that is a little SURPRIZING in that it MUST have the name of a bug IN THE POEM ~ Yep!! Weird, right? It’s an “invented poetry form” but then, I guess, at one point or another, they are all invented so we’ll say this one is somewhat recent. It was difficult to find out very much about it but here’s what I have uncovered:

“American 767” is a three-lined poetic form invented by Dennis L. Dean. It’s important to follow the specifics for each line.


The syllable requirement is:

Line 1: 7 syllables

Line 2: 6 syllables

Line 3: 7 syllables

          ~ Hence the “767” in the name of this poetic form.


But here’s the REALLY CRAZY requirement (maybe Dennis L. Dean is an entomologist or something; maybe his favorite movie is Arachnophobia ~ I love that movie) . . . whatever the reason, the point is the poem must have the name of a BUG (of the insect kingdom) in it. LOL. Yeah, that’s it – from the samples I found looks like you can have a title OR not, no specific punctuation rules, no rhyming required (but it doesn’t seem to indicate that you can’t rhyme, so . . .) and I saw some examples that included several 3 line verses of this variety to create one poem. So, have fun. This is one the kids will probably enjoy. Cheers!!


(I couldn't resist adding this meme that one of my friends found yesterday! Perfect!)

     The basic guidelines for the American 767 poetry form are:


1.   Three lines, each with a required syllable count (7, 6, 7).
2.   Line one: 7 syllables – Line two: 6 syllables – Line three: 7 syllables.
3.   Rhyming is not required (but it’s probably fine if you choose to rhyme).
4.   The poem MUST contain the name of a BUG in it!!

 

Here are a couple of examples I wrote a few years ago. And I admit – I only used the word bug – not the actual name of a spider in the second one because of the syllable count – it fit and black widow spider didn’t, but it WAS a black widow spider that 3-year-old Mandy was holding up!! Yikes!!

Can’t wait to see what people come up with!! Fun, fun, fun!! So . . .  what’s bugging you?

 


 Do you really bring good luck?

Ladybug, Ladybug

Come land on me, if you please

© 2018 Stephanie Abney

 



Look, “Buggy, buggy,” she cried!

“Black bug’s tummy is red.”

Dad sends it to bug heaven.

© 2018 Stephanie Abney

 

 

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Sunday, April 7, 2024

Day 7 2024 ~ How to write a “Dodoitsu Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"

We are going to write a DODOITSU poem today. Fun times!!!

Like many Japanese poetry styles, this one focuses on counting syllables – but not the same three lines of 5,7,5 syllables as the Haiku. This one is DIFFERENT ~

Here’s a bit of background:

Dodoitsu poems appeared around the late 1860s. They were favored by working-class citizens. The name’s translation is basically, “quickly, city to city.”

The Dodoitsu has even been called the “Japanese limerick” as most revolved around love, work, and daily life, from a humorous perspective; so as a general rule, they did not explore deep thoughts. But rather, they were used as a way to record those off-the-wall funny moments in one’s day.

I have a dear friend who writes AT LEAST a poem a day and includes her poems in her journal as they usually reflect her day. See what you come up with.

 

Here is the format:

FOUR LINES: (only counting syllables – no rhyming required, nor excluded . . . just whatever).

The first 3 lines ALL HAVE SEVEN SYLLABLES.

And the 4th line has FIVE SYLLABLES.

 

That’s it ~ simple, right? Yeah, that’s what I thought. You give it a try. Write as many as suits your fancy today.

Here are some examples I wrote a few years ago:

 



More to do than I have time

Still, I write this little rhyme

A moment here, moment there

Need a cherry coke!

                © 2021 Stephanie Abney




 

Taught the boys to do some math

They groaned about it too much

So now they have to shout out:

We love math! Love math!

                © 2021 Stephanie Abney

 

I love my grandkids so much

They’re very entertaining

They melt my heart with a smile

Yes, come stay a while

                © 2021 Stephanie Abney

 


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.