Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Day 23 2024 ~ How to write a “Cinquain Poem, Pattern 3” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"


Yep, you guessed it – next is Pattern 3 for a Cinquain Poem.  As I mentioned a couple of days ago, there are three basic ways to construct a Cinquain Poem; one is by counting the number of syllables per line, another by counting the number of words per line and the last one counts WORDS (except for line 4) BUT with very SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS!! Today we will finish off writing cinquain poems by following the guidelines for pattern 3.

Cinquain poems always have FIVE LINES, but the version I call “Pattern 3,” you will need to fill each line in ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTIONS BELOW!! J

This Cinquain Poem has a certain number of words for lines 1, 2, 3, and 5 but line 4 is any phrase (just a short sentence) you want to use so to sort of “pull it all together”

Here is the PATTERN:   

Line 1: A noun

Line 2: Two adjectives

Line 3: Three “-ing” verbs

Line 4: A phrase (short, but no specific number of words)

Line 5: Another word for the noun in line 1

 

Here are two examples of mine I wrote a while ago:

                                                                    


Dancer
Graceful, lyrical
Leaping, twirling, spinning
My beautiful granddaughter
Payton
 

                                                                                                     © 2019 Stephanie Abney


 


Babies
Sweet, precious
Laughing, babbling, crying
If only they stayed little
Adorable

                                                 © 2011 Stephanie Abney

 

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo credits: Pixabay

Monday, April 22, 2024

Day 22 2024 ~ How to write a Cinquain Poem (pattern 2) for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ “30 poems in 30 days”

 

Yep! You guessed it – Pattern 2 Cinquain follows Pattern 1.

You’re doing great!! A cinquain poem, Pattern TWO, counts WORDS, not syllables. Fun!!

American poet Adelaide Crapsey invented this five-line poetry form. You may recall that Cinq is French for “FIVE.” However, Adelaide took her inspiration from the Japanese haiku and tanka, rather than from the French. Go figure.

This short five-lined poem doesn’t have an actual title; rather, the FIRST line (one word) becomes the title.

It does not need to rhyme and in this version, you count the number of words per line and each line has specific requirements for what kinds of words to use:

 

1st line ~ one word – the subject (or title) or your poem

2nd line ~ two words that describe the title/subject

3rd line ~ three words that express action (using 3 “ing” participles works well here, if you like, or just 3 verbs)

4th line ~ four words that express a thought or feeling

5th line ~ one-word synonym for the title (restates your subject using a different  word)

 

(These poems look nice when they are centered) 


Create

Something new

Painting, singing, crafting

Your vision of things

Transformaton

                                              © 2024 Stephanie Abney

 


Family

Getting married

Trying, learning, growing

Working things out together

Love

                                                     © 2023 Stephanie Abney

 

[Or not using participles . . . just an action phrase for line 3]

 

Service

Helping others

Let’s work together

Bearing one another’s burdens

Love

                                                               © 2011 Stephanie Abney

 

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Sunday, April 21, 2024

Day 21 2024 ~ How to write a Cinquain Poem (pattern 1) for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ “30 poems in 30 days”

I really love cinquain poetry. Depending on where you get your instructions there are a few variations. I’ve narrowed it down to three. Some years I share all three variations in one post but this year I’m going to share them one variation at a time, starting with the version I call “pattern one.”

Cinq is French for FIVE ~ this poem has five lines that follow a specific pattern, each line has its own purpose; title/subject, describe subject, express ACTION, then share a thought or feeling and for the end, you will restate your title using a different word(s), with only a two syllable count. DETAILS of how it goes are below in yellow.

This short five-lined poem doesn’t have an actual title; rather, the FIRST line (two syllables in this case) becomes the title.

It does not need to rhyme and in this version, you count the number of SYLLABLES per line and each line has specific requirements. The first line has 2 syllables; each line increases by 2 syllables until the last line, which returns to 2 syllables.

RESIST the urge to add words - follow the pattern - you'll be surprised at your results!!

1st line ~ two syllables – the subject (or title) or your poem ~ either two one-syllable words or one two-syllable word

2nd line ~ four syllables that describe the title/subject

3rd line ~ six syllables that express action

4th line ~ eight syllables that express a thought or feeling

5th line ~ two syllables that show a synonym for the title (restates your subject using a different word)

Here are a couple of my poems as examples of a cinquain poem, (pattern 1). These are from years past, but remain two of my favorites:




Comfort
Feeling secure
Where judgment has no place
Wrapped in the safety of your arms
Husband


    © Stephanie Abney 
1998

 

           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




Children
A gift from God
Grace our lives for a time
Remain in our hearts forever
Precious


   © Stephanie Abney 
1999 


 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

 

Saturday, April 20, 2024

Day 20 2024 ~ How to write a “Tan-Renga” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"

This is a fun poetry from – we’ve done it several times before, because I like it! So here ya’ go:

You can’t do this one all by yourself ~ you’ll need to grab a partner because we are going to write a “Tan-Renga,” which is a Japanese poem of collaboration. It’s fun, really. Here’s the thing – you will need to find someone to write this (SHORT – 5 line) poem with. Even if you live alone, you can find someone. It can be done together, in person, or over the phone, or via text, or email, or whatever works for you. Your partner in writing this poem can be a spouse, a child, a neighbor, a friend; heck, it can be your mail carrier – just someone other than yourself needs to help write this poem.

This is basically a Tanka poem (which we did on the 13th this year) BUT with one catch ~ one person writes the first three lines (I’ll review the pattern below – it’s only 5 lines) and the second person finishes off the poem with the last two lines, almost as if in response to your first three lines.

The name, Tan-Renga (from Japanese) translates as "short linked poem" or "short connecting poem." 

Here is a Tanka in a nutshell, with the different lines highlighted by who writes them. Rhyming doesn’t even enter in. The only concern is the number of syllables per line: 5, 7, 5, 7, 7 . . . but for this style – it matters who writes which lines, as follows:

Line 1 = 5 syllables     (1st person writes)

Line 2 = 7 syllables     (1st person writes)

Line 3 = 5 syllables     (1st person writes)

Line 4 = 7 syllables     (2nd person writes)

Line 5 = 7 syllables     (2nd person writes)

 

So, 7 years ago I had my husband, Jim, write this Tan-Renga with me ~  

I wrote the first three lines and he responded with the last two lines and together we came up with this:

 


Our life together

Has had a few learning curves

The highs and the lows

Giving, growing and loving

We have become companions

 

© 2017 by Stephanie and Jim Abney

 

 

Since he is wisely asleep at this hour (about 4 am Saturday morning), I can’t have him help me write another one right now – but we might do it again later and then I can come back and add it or share it on my FB National Poetry Month group. Cheers!!

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Friday, April 19, 2024

Day 19 2024 ~ How to write a “Pensee Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"

Here’s a poetry form that I really enjoy. I basically use it every year. I had so much fun with this Pensee poems when I taught school. It’s amazing what the students come up with. Let’s see what y’all can do with it. You need to follow the directions exactly – more counting of syllables but no rhyming required. I even created a little fill in the blank chart to help you out! Cheers!!

How to write a “Pensee Poem” ~ “pensee” is a French word that means “a reflection or thought.” 

It is a five-line, structured poem that does not rhyme.

Each line has a specific number of syllables and addresses a specific part of the poem ~ see box below.

The thing to watch out for is to follow the pattern, including WHAT should be expressed on each line, using a SPECIFIC number of syllables ~ and remember – THIS poem does not rhyme.                              

Line

Pattern

Example

Line 1

Subject (2 syllables)      

Freedom

Line 2

Description (4 syllables)  

Our liberties

Line 3

Action (7 syllables)             

Granted unto us by God

Line 4

Setting (8 syllables)      

Outlined in our Constitution

Line 5

Final thought (6 syllables)      

Thank you Founding Fathers

 

This is how the above example looks as a poem:

Freedom
Our liberties
Granted unto us by God
Outlined in our Constitution
Thank-you Founding Fathers   

         © 2014 Stephanie Abney

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s one I did today ~

 

Finish

To just be done

Even though I try and try

I live in constant frustration

I am better than this.

 

      © 2024 Stephanie Abney

 

And here are a couple more examples from previous years:

 

 Grandkids

So full of love

Throwing their arms around me

As we snuggle on Grandma’s couch

I lead such a charmed life

                               © 2018 Stephanie Abney

 

 

 

Ice cream

Cold, smooth and sweet

Makes its way to my tummy

At the end of a trying day

For now, all is just fine.

            © 2016 Stephanie Abney

 

So, these are a few of my examples, but you get the idea. So, go ahead and try several ~ perhaps one about an emotion, an animal, one of your favorite foods, or a time of year (holiday/season), an event, or something in nature. What comes to mind?

 

(photos from Pixabay)


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Thursday, April 18, 2024

Day 18 2024 ~ How to write a “Rhyme Royal Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"

Y’all are doing great so far!! Today we will explore 7-lined poems called “septets.” A septet can be a poem of any form or meter as long as it has seven lines. But before you rush off to do that – let’s explore a SPECIFIC type of septet: a RHYME ROYAL. This is actually the most common form of septet poetry and the only 7-lined poem to have its own special name.

A Rhyme Royal was popularized by Geoffrey Chaucer and it began to be called “royal” because James I of Scotland used it for his own verses.

It has VERY SPECIFIC guidelines, which are:

SEVEN LINES, each having EXACTLY TEN SYLLABLES in them.

There is also a SPECIFIC rhyming PATTERN: a·b·a·b·b·c·c

An example can be found in William Wordsworth poem, “Resolution and Independence”

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45545/resolution-and-independence

So your topic can be anything as long as the poem is 7 lines long and each line has 10 syllables in it and the ending rhymes follow the pattern a·b·a·b·b·c·c

And it that makes you crazy, just write any ol’ septet, which is a seven-lined poem of any form you choose, including free verse.


Here is one of my examples of a “Rhyme Royal”:









Being with my family is the best.

Laughing, crying, and playing together.

We have such fun when we are on a quest.

Loving and supporting one another.

Father and mother, sister and brother.

Families can be eternally bound.

This is the way true happiness is found.

                        © 2019 Stephanie Abney

 

And here I have broken it down by lines and ending rhymes:

 

1. Being with my family is the best. A

2. Laughing, crying, and playing together. B

3. We have such fun when we are on a quest. A

4. Loving and supporting one another. B

5. Father and mother, sister and brother. B

6. Families can be eternally bound. C

7. This is the way true happiness is found. C

Okay, YOUR TURN!! Cheers!!

 

(Photo by kai kalhh from Pixabay)

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Wednesday, April 17, 2024

Day 17, 2024 ~ How to write a “Spring Senses Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days"

Here’s a fun little poem that involves the five senses: sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste. How do YOU envision Spring? You can fill in the blank with a single word or two or you can write full-on sentences. It's basically free verse as there are no required rhyming patterns, unless, of course, YOU want to make it rhyme, which is perfectly fine.


Here is the pattern:

Spring Senses Poem
Spring looks like________________
Spring sounds like_______________
Spring feels like_________________
Spring smells like________________
Spring tastes like________________

Here's one example of mine:

Spring Senses Poem
Spring looks like sunshine.                         
Spring sounds like birds singing.      
Spring feels like a cool breeze.
Spring smells like mint leaves.
Spring tastes like strawberries.

                   © Stephanie Abney 2016











There is another way to approach a "Spring Senses Poem." You can start each line of the poem with the function of that sense, like this:

Spring Senses Poem
I see_____________________
I hear____________________
I feel_____________________
I smell___________________
I taste____________________

Also, feel free to create this poem with the various five senses in whichever order suits you.

So, here's my example of this style using I in front of each of the five senses.

Spring Senses Poem
I see a mother hen gather her chicks.
I hear the song of a meadowlark.
I feel the warmth of the sun on my face.
I smell the fragrant dogwood blossoms.
I taste fresh cherry pie.

                © Stephanie Abney 2016


YOUR TURN!!! 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Tuesday, April 16, 2024

Day 16 2024 ~ How to write a “Diamante Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth ~ "30 poems in 30 days

 

Apparently, we have never done a Diamante Poem in all the years I have been doing this challenge. I did it with my students when I was teaching so I just assumed we had done it here, but I double checked with a search on my blog, and nope, we have never done this format. So . . .

Hold on to your hats!! This one will really tickle the ol’ brain cells! It’s fun and it’s tricky. Here’s what you need to know:

A diamante poem is a 7-lined diamond-shaped poem that generally illustrates growth or change from one extreme to another. It follows a specific formula. Basically, it starts with a single word and ends with its opposite. And it’s surprisingly more challenging than it appears.

Line 1: One noun (or topic)
Line 2: Two adjectives about the noun in Line 1
Line 3: Three gerunds (-ing verbs) that relate to the noun in Line 1
Line 4: Four nouns ~ (This is the transition point where the poem changes from one of the opposites to the other.)

(the first two nouns relate to the noun in Line 1,

the last two nouns relate to the noun in Line 7)

Line 5: Three gerunds (-ing verbs) that relate to the noun in Line 7
Line 6: Two adjectives that describe the noun in Line 7
Line 7: One noun that is the opposite of the noun used in Line 1     


Example:

Girls

Curious, creative

Sharing, learning, exploring

Sugar, spice, snips, snails

Climbing, daring, hollerin’

Active, mischievous

Boys

(Author Unknown)

 

Here’s more of a visual:

Noun
Adjective, Adjective
ing-Verb, ing-Verb, ing-Verb
Noun, Noun,
Noun, Noun
ing-Verb, ing-Verb, ing-Verb
Adjective, Adjective
Noun

  

 

City
busy crowded
bustling rushing honking
offices building farmland tractors
grazing growing harvesting
spacious green
Country

© Denise Rogers ClassroomPoems.com

 Photo by John Cameron on Unsplash


 
                                                             Photo by Match Sùmàyà on Unsplash

 

 

Sad

Distraught, hopeless

Crying, hurting, sighing

Despair, discouragement, comfort, joy

Loving, caring, sharing

Blissful, delightful

Happy

 © Stephanie Abney 2024

 

For more ideas, check out Kenn Nesbitt’s Poetry4Kids website – you can peruse his site for hours. Great stuff, especially when working with children, but adults can learn a bunch there as well ~


Give it a shot ~ whatcha’ got?

 

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they create them and especially once they post them. Thanks so much!

*** Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or elsewhere on social media ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO EACH DAY’S SPECIFIC BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.