Thursday, April 9, 2020

Day 9 ~ “Pleiades Poem” for for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



Day 9 ~ “Pleiades Poem” for for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"

Today’s poetry form might be very unfamiliar. I discovered it a couple of years ago.

It’s called a Pleiades Poem! It was created in 1999 by Craig Tigerman, Editor Emeritus of Sol Magazine, which appears to have been a poetry journal that is no longer in publication. At any rate, he named it for a star cluster in the constellation Taurus, “The Pleiades.”

It has some interesting requirements. You can ONLY use ONE word for the title of the poem. It ONLY has ONE stanza that is SEVEN LINES - any length - (so don’t go creating additional verses – this form only has one).

AND here is the TRICKY and FUN part ~ VERY specific!!

The FIRST letter of each of the following 7 lines MUST start with the same letter as the first letter of the title of the poem. Kind of reminds me of those families who named every one of their kids with names that begin with the same letter. So, the sentence can be any length, as long as the first word starts with the same letter as the title 

So this poetic form lends itself to a lot of alliteration!! Fun stuff!!

We will write ours as Craig Tigerman first designed it (others have tried to add syllable requirements, etc.) but Tigerman only said it had to be a single word title, with seven lines, each line beginning with the same first letter as the title.

If you want some help coming up with words that start with the same letter you can go here and choose your letter and find lots of words that start with that letter:

Another useful site: Dictionary of Unusual Words ~ just click on the letter of your choice and you get a plethora of unique words with brief definitions.

Oh, the examples I saw online have the first line start with a capital letter and the rest start with a lowercase letter and the final line ends with a period. (You can insert commas where needed).
Here are a few examples: the first two are contrasting viewpoints of the Coronavirus and the 3rd one shows how simple they can be, about basically anything – it’s one I wrote about cucumbers a couple of years ago:











COVID19

Cunning coronavirus has
closed businesses, cancelled school, trips, graduation,
choir concerts, prom and more, as
captive, crying, frightened citizens, stay
completely away from others, covering their faces with masks, causing
concern, sadness, fear, and discouragement as our
constitutional rights, health, loved ones, and careers are in jeopardy.

                                      © 2020 Stephanie Abney


VS













COVID19

~ Challenging the creativity and endurance of officials, heathcare workers,
~ caregivers, first responders, families and, teachers, who are
~ creating online curriculum and classrooms, activities, and connections,
~ capable of bringing students and loved ones together,
~ cherishing time to think, reflect, and draw families close
~ completing long over-due projects, while finding time to read, draw and make beautiful art
~ completely content to be at home, hoping and praying together for the best and quickest outcome, while consuming chocolate and unusual culinary creations made from whatever is on their shelves.
                                                                                                          
                                                        © 2020 Stephanie Abney



Cucumbers

Crinkley edges,
crucnchy, crisp and
creeping vine bearing
cucumiform fruits,
cultivated plant,
comes from the gourd family,
cucurbitaceae.
                         © 2018 Stephanie Abney





PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.


Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Day 8 Octopoem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 8 Octopoem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"

An “Octopoem” is a fun little poem that has 8 lines, perfect for Day 8!

Yes, I have used this form on previous Day 8’s ~ it’s a fun choice for the 8th

Pick a topic (usually a person) of your choice and describe them in EIGHT lines.

Wait! Don’t start yet!

HERE ARE THE RULES FOR AN OCTOPOEM:

Each line can be as long as you choose, BUT use only one sentence per line.
This poem does not need to rhyme, nor do you need to count syllables.
BUT you do need to follow the order of the descriptions you use for each of the 8 lines.


You can give your octopoem a title or just start right out with line 1.

It seems to be best suited to describe people, but you can get creative and describe a pet, a literary character, or even an object, etc. ~ just be aware, one of the lines is about clothing style.

And, for fun, this year I wrote one about myself and that worked too!

Have fun!!

An octopoem has 8 lines describing a person, or a pet, or whatever:

line 1: must include a color
line 2: must name a season
line 3: must state a place
line 4: must mention the weather
line 5: must describe their clothing
line 6: must mention some type of furniture
line 7: must name a TV show
line 8: must have a type of food

Here’s an example poem I wrote about my dad last year:




















I Miss You, Daddy


My dad’s eyes were blue, his favorite color
He loved to garden in the spring and summer
In what used to be our backyard lawn
The Southern California weather was perfect
He wore comfortable clothes to garden in, often rolling up the cuffs of his pants
He could sit outside on the lounge chair for hours enjoying life at that moment
Unless it was time for “The Wheel of Fortune” and “Jeopardy”
He’d close each day with a bowl of ice cream

                                         © 2019 Stephanie Abney





And then, here is one I wrote this
year and I even decided to write it 
about myself - so, that's kind of new: 


My studio is bursting with every color of the rainbow.
It usually feels like summer here.
That’s because I live in the Arizona desert.
I love the sudden showers during monsoon season, although they can be destructive.
I’m most comfortable in pants with an elastic waistband.
I’m content if I can get my feet up once a day while in my recliner.
That’s a perfect excuse to watch TV, especially if it is a K-Drama or Hallmark movie.
If I can eat salmon and broccoli, I am a happy camper.

                                                                   © 2020 Stephanie Abney


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who wrote them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo courtesy of Stephanie Abney

                                         

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Day 7 ~ How to write a “What if . . . I might” Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"



Day 7 ~ How to write a “What if . . . I might” Poem

Yesterday’s autobiographical poems were so interesting and fun. This one is super easy – it’s basically a “finish the sentence” type of poetry form. Even so, I think you will be pleased and surprised at the results! 

A seven-line poem for Day 7 ~ This is a poem that will get you thinking of many possibilities; some thoughtful, others silly, some adventurous, or even fanciful, some surprisingly profound. Let your imagination go or reach deep into your heart. 

SEVEN LINES:
Fill in the blanks any way you want – changing the words you can create dozens of poems.

Line #1:  What if ____________________________
Line #2:  I might ____________________________

(leave a space between lines 2 & 3)
 
Line #3:  What if ____________________________
Line #4:  I could _____________________________

(leave a space between lines 4 & 5)

Line #5:  What if ____________________________
Line #6:  I would_____________________________

(leave a space between lines 6 & 7)
 
Line #7:  Ask a question.


Have fun!!

HERE ARE MY EXAMPLES – (from a few years ago – if I get some new ones written, I’ll come back and add them in or even exchange them. We’ll see. But I wanted to get the post ready for everyone else! Cheers!!)
I wanted to write new examples for this year, but, as sometimes happens, I am running behind and these examples give you a good enough idea. I’m anxious to see what you come up with though!! Cheers!!


The first one is silly: 

What if I danced in the rain?
I might get a little bit wet.
What if I sang at the top of my lungs?
I could land a singing contract, I bet.

What if I went back inside and sat down?
I would never know what I might do.

I wonder, would you be so bold, if it were you?

                                      © 2011 Stephanie Abney





This one is more serious:

What if I listened very carefully to the spirit?
I might be surprised at what I hear.

What if the Lord has plans I'm not ready for?
I could try to pretend I didn't hear them.

What if I listened and obeyed?
I would be more use to His children.

Do you think I'm that strong?
                               © 2011 Stephanie Abney




This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:
A Month of Poetry "30 Poems in 30 Days" April #National Poetry Month

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Monday, April 6, 2020

Day 6 ~ How to write an “Eleven Line Autobiographical Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 6 ~ How to write an “Eleven Line Autobiographical Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

So we are off to a really good start with poetry month. What do you say we get to know each other a little better?

Today we will be writing an “Eleven Line Autobiographical Poem.” 

It’s pretty easy in that it is basically a “fill-in-the-blank” poem, but it can be hard too because there is a certain amount of vulnerability inherent in this poem. SO, if you have personal reasons, legal reasons, anxiety reasons, etc. you can make it about a fictional person or if you are a writer, you can make it about a character in your book or if you are a reader, you could write about one of your favorite characters – but please indicate it is fictional so we don’t think those things are YOUR traits! LOL!!

But, if you are game – tell us about yourself. (You can always do this poetry form and just keep it for yourself and/or posterity. If you belong to our private FB group then, you should probably feel comfortable sharing these things about yourself there in the group). Up to you ~

Basically, you answer the questions, and then you remove the question part on lines 1, 2, and 11 so the poem stands alone. Notice the final poem after I answer the questions and then remove the line #s and the questions on 1, 2, and 11.

Here is the format: 

line 1: your first name
line 2: four character traits
line 3: Sibling of
line 4: Lover of
line 5: Who feels
line 6: Who needs
line 7: Who gives
line 8: Who fears
line 9: Who would like to see
line 10: Resident of
line 11: your last name

I’ll go ahead and fill in the blanks and then show it the finished product below ~ being online here on my blog – my name is already “out there” so here is my example, step by step:

line 1: your first name Stephanie
line 2: four character traits Compassionate, creative, supportive, artistic
line 3: Sibling of Camille
line 4: Lover of life, family, country and the Lord
line 5: Who feels happiest creating something and surrounded by family
line 6: Who needs appreciation, understanding, and words of affirmation
line 7: Who gives service, encouragement and love
line 8: Who fears she may not have done enough
line 9: Who would like to see an end of this Coronavirus pandemic
line 10: Resident of my house, under social distancing!
line 11: your last name Abney






Stephanie
Compassionate, creative, supportive, artistic
Sibling of Camille
Lover of life, family, country and the Lord
Who feels happiest creating something and surrounded by family
Who needs appreciation, understanding, and words of affirmation
Who gives service, encouragement and love
Who fears she may not have done enough
Who would like to see an end of this Coronavirus Pandemic
Resident of my house, under social distancing!
Abney





This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Day 5 ~ How to write a Triplet for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 5 ~ How to write a Triplet for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

Wow! Yesterday our FB group was going crazy with so many couplets!! It was fabulous!! So, now that you’ve got that down – let’s see how you do when we add one more line:

  Let’s write TRIPLETS!

Now, depending on which EXPERT source you check things out at, you are bound to get different definitions for various forms of poetry. Odd, I know. But I'm trying to find the most accurate definitions as I can for this challenge. Some people use the term "tercet" and "triplet" interchangeably when discussing poetry, but that's not what I have found. A "tercet" is a 3-lined poem (which may or may not rhyme and may or may not share the same meter). Therefore, yes, a "triplet" is a "tercet" BUT all "tercets" are not triplets. Go figure.

A "TRIPLET" is a very specific type of tercet and for our purposes we will follow these rules:

Triplets are 3-lined poems that rhyme.

BUT ~ HERE’S THE IMPORTANT PART ~
EVERY LINE HAS THE SAME NUMBER OF SYLLABLES or BEATS (and YOU get to choose how many beats your poem will have – just keep the same number of syllables for each line)!

Fun times ~ it helps to think of a topic first, any topic (nature is usually the easiest to get an idea about).

Here's a well-known triplet:







Hear no evil
See no evil
Speak no evil










Here’s an example for ya’ ~ I’m hilarious!!

I pray my words today are sweet,
in case there’s some I have to eat,
it makes friends easier to keep!
                     © 2011 by Stephanie Abney


This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.


Saturday, April 4, 2020

Day 4 ~ How to write a Couplet for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 4 ~ How to write a Couplet for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

The poems about rainbows yesterday were amazing!! Thanks for participating!! Today, we are going to get down to basics: Every poet should know how to write a couplet. It's easy and can be the basis of other poems and it’s only TWO lines of poetry. How easy is that?

A couplet can stand alone or you can use any number of couplets to create a longer poem. Here’s what you need to know:

Although I’ve seen some that are totally random, the dictionary definition of a “couplet” suggests that they usually consist of two lines that rhyme and have the same meter.

Try expressing your complete thought in two mid-sized poetic lines. The last words should rhyme. It can be spiritual or silly or romantic or whatever suits your fancy – couplets are great to write for children or with children.

Here a couple of couplets (hee hee) ~ well, here’s three of them, actually!!

My puppy chews on everything
But mostly tugs at my heartstrings.
                               © 2017 Andilyn Jenkins



I know the Lord is mindful of me,
And it makes me happy as can be.
                             © 2011 by Stephanie Abney

Carefully stringing thoughts along
Into lovely little word-songs.
                      © 2014 ~ Stephanie Abney

Did you think of a couplet? Just look around and think about any object or emotion and highlight it in two rhyming sentences. Cheers!!

This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:

PLEASE REMEMBER 


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.


Friday, April 3, 2020

Day 3 ~ How to write a Rainbow Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 3 ~ How to write a Rainbow Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

The first two days of National Poetry Month have been awesome!! I hope anyone reading this post will join in the fun!! When I taught school I loved to highlight “special” days – basically, “National Days” – I would write what “day” (or days) we were celebrating up in the corner of the whiteboard and I would often have some of their work feature things about that day or the thing that was being celebrated, especially writing assignments. 

TODAY, April 3rd, is “National Find A Rainbow Day,” among other things, such as: National Walking Day, Pony Express Day, Paraprofessional Appreciation Day, National Film Score Day, and Pony Express Day. 

There are a few templates for writing about rainbows that school teachers often use, especially an Acrostic Poem where you write the word “rainbow” down the left side of the paper and each line must begin with the letter on the left. 

Or you can name each of the colors in order and say something about the color or what it reminds you of, using either similes or metaphors. (A simile uses the word ‘like’ or ‘as’ in order to make a comparison, whereas metaphors use ‘is’ or ‘are.’)

OR, ya’ can just go rogue on us and use free verse (which some of you are chomping at the bit to do). I generally focus on a particular poetic form each day in order to “teach” that form and to encourage people who shy away from poetry that it actually is easy to write if you are following a pattern. But today – how about sharing your thoughts on rainbows using any type of poem you want? And tomorrow we will get back to some set poetic formulas.

If you name each color, don’t forget your “ROY G. BIV” you learned as a kid:

Red 
Orange 
Yellow 
Green 
Blue 
Indigo 
Violet 

Here are a couple of examples or, go ahead and use free verse ~

Reaching across the sky
Announcing God’s Promise
Is a glorious rainbow
Never again will He flood the earth
Blessings are waiting just
Over the rainbow
Wait and see

                      © 2020 Stephanie Abney















Red is strong, like the safety of your arms
Orange is exciting, like the dawning of a new day
Yellow is soft, like a downy new chick
Green is for growth, like a plant bursting through the dirt
Blue is forever, like the ocean
Indigo is spiritual, like the conviction to do what is right
Violet is peaceful, like a newborn babe looking into your eyes

                                       © 2020 Stephanie Abney


I want to work on a free verse one today as well, once I finish it, I’ll come back and insert it here.

In the meantime, what’s comes to mind when you see a rainbow?

This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much! 

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or FB page ~ that's awesome. But PLEASE don't just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog of FB wall or wherever and LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I've spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.