Saturday, April 4, 2020

Day 4 ~ How to write a Couplet for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 4 ~ How to write a Couplet for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

The poems about rainbows yesterday were amazing!! Thanks for participating!! Today, we are going to get down to basics: Every poet should know how to write a couplet. It's easy and can be the basis of other poems and it’s only TWO lines of poetry. How easy is that?

A couplet can stand alone or you can use any number of couplets to create a longer poem. Here’s what you need to know:

Although I’ve seen some that are totally random, the dictionary definition of a “couplet” suggests that they usually consist of two lines that rhyme and have the same meter.

Try expressing your complete thought in two mid-sized poetic lines. The last words should rhyme. It can be spiritual or silly or romantic or whatever suits your fancy – couplets are great to write for children or with children.

Here a couple of couplets (hee hee) ~ well, here’s three of them, actually!!

My puppy chews on everything
But mostly tugs at my heartstrings.
                               © 2017 Andilyn Jenkins



I know the Lord is mindful of me,
And it makes me happy as can be.
                             © 2011 by Stephanie Abney

Carefully stringing thoughts along
Into lovely little word-songs.
                      © 2014 ~ Stephanie Abney

Did you think of a couplet? Just look around and think about any object or emotion and highlight it in two rhyming sentences. Cheers!!

This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:

PLEASE REMEMBER 


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.


Friday, April 3, 2020

Day 3 ~ How to write a Rainbow Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 3 ~ How to write a Rainbow Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

The first two days of National Poetry Month have been awesome!! I hope anyone reading this post will join in the fun!! When I taught school I loved to highlight “special” days – basically, “National Days” – I would write what “day” (or days) we were celebrating up in the corner of the whiteboard and I would often have some of their work feature things about that day or the thing that was being celebrated, especially writing assignments. 

TODAY, April 3rd, is “National Find A Rainbow Day,” among other things, such as: National Walking Day, Pony Express Day, Paraprofessional Appreciation Day, National Film Score Day, and Pony Express Day. 

There are a few templates for writing about rainbows that school teachers often use, especially an Acrostic Poem where you write the word “rainbow” down the left side of the paper and each line must begin with the letter on the left. 

Or you can name each of the colors in order and say something about the color or what it reminds you of, using either similes or metaphors. (A simile uses the word ‘like’ or ‘as’ in order to make a comparison, whereas metaphors use ‘is’ or ‘are.’)

OR, ya’ can just go rogue on us and use free verse (which some of you are chomping at the bit to do). I generally focus on a particular poetic form each day in order to “teach” that form and to encourage people who shy away from poetry that it actually is easy to write if you are following a pattern. But today – how about sharing your thoughts on rainbows using any type of poem you want? And tomorrow we will get back to some set poetic formulas.

If you name each color, don’t forget your “ROY G. BIV” you learned as a kid:

Red 
Orange 
Yellow 
Green 
Blue 
Indigo 
Violet 

Here are a couple of examples or, go ahead and use free verse ~

Reaching across the sky
Announcing God’s Promise
Is a glorious rainbow
Never again will He flood the earth
Blessings are waiting just
Over the rainbow
Wait and see

                      © 2020 Stephanie Abney















Red is strong, like the safety of your arms
Orange is exciting, like the dawning of a new day
Yellow is soft, like a downy new chick
Green is for growth, like a plant bursting through the dirt
Blue is forever, like the ocean
Indigo is spiritual, like the conviction to do what is right
Violet is peaceful, like a newborn babe looking into your eyes

                                       © 2020 Stephanie Abney


I want to work on a free verse one today as well, once I finish it, I’ll come back and insert it here.

In the meantime, what’s comes to mind when you see a rainbow?

This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much! 

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog or FB page ~ that's awesome. But PLEASE don't just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog of FB wall or wherever and LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I've spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work. 



Thursday, April 2, 2020

Day 2 ~ How to write a Japanese Ukiah poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 2 ~ How to write a Japanese Ukiah poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"

Welcome! Yesterday was SUCH fun – hope you were able to write a Japanese Dodoitsu poem with us – if not, you can look it up on Day 1 ~ but THIS is Day 2!! Let’s continue with another simple Japanese poem. I bet you haven’t heard of this one either!! I hadn’t, but I’m anxious to try it: we will be writing Ukiah Poems!! (It’s another short poem – they will get longer as we move along through the month, and then shorter, and then longer, etc.). Cheers!!

How do you write Ukiah poetry, you say? Look at the spelling – it is Haiku spelled backward, BUT it has VERY SPECIFIC rules ~ this poem requires all three lines to have an ending rhyme and instead of being a 5-7-5 syllable pattern, it is a 7-5-7 pattern.

This style of poetry was invented by Robert Ropars in 2009. It’s a “reverse haiku” in every sense. Not only did he switch the lines for the number of syllables but he required that it rhyme since haikus are not intended to rhyme. There are no suggestions on subject matter so you have a wide open field of what to write about today! Have fun!

Here is the format:

THREE LINES: specific syllable counts per line and this poem needs to rhyme!!

The first and third lines HAVE SEVEN SYLLABLES.
The second, middle line only has FIVE SYLLABLES.

AND – all three lines need to have an ending rhyme.

(Those ending rhymes are what make this style tricky). Have fun!!

Oh, and just a heads up: neither Haiku nor Ukiah poems are supposed to have titles – just let the 3 lines stand alone – no further explanation!! So, NO TITLES! Cheers!!

Use of punctuation is strictly optional; use what suits you or use none at all.
~~~~

Once again, here is that handy little online free syllable counter if you want to be sure of your syllable counts:
How Many Syllables - Free Online Syllable Counter


AND – here is a free online rhyming dictionary – very awesome and helpful for if/when you get stuck:
Free Online Rhyming Dictionary


Feel free to share your poems in the comments here on my blog (ALL CREATIVE WORK REMAINS THE PROPERTY OF THE AUTHOR) or in our FB group – you’ll find the link below, or directly on your own FB wall, or Instagram, or your blog, or just keep a notebook of your poems this month – whatever suits your fancy. We DO love seeing each other’s poems though.

However, if you do share it on your own social media pages please do not copy and paste these directions, but rather just link back to this page. See additional conditions below. Thanks.

I found the limitations of this poetic form to be challenging. I can’t wait to see what everyone else comes up with. Y’all amaze me, but for what’s it’s worth, here are my UKIAH poetry efforts:


Reading everyone’s poem
While stuck in my home
Helps the stay inside syndrome

                              © 2020 Stephanie Abney














I’d like to be slim and trim
My prospects are grim
Since I don’t go to the gym

                             © 2020 Stephanie Abney

Some things we cannot condone
More time spent alone
Makes me grateful for my phone

                            © 2020 Stephanie Abney

This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:
A Month of Poetry "30 Poems in 30 Days" April #National Poetry Month


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.



Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Day 1 ~ How to write a Japanese Dodoitsu poem for #NationalPoetryMonth - "30 poems in 30 days"


Day 1 ~ How to write a Japanese Dodoitsu poem

Yay!! April has arrived (after a rather LONG March – but, hey, April is about to seem even longer with all of the “Stay Home, Stay Safe” and social distancing directives across the nation) so I’m really happy that it is NATIONAL POETRY MONTH ~ something to keep us connected, get the creative juices flowing, and allow for some much-needed expression. Who’s ready to join me?

A poem a day for 30 days during the month of April ~ Many people reading this right now have done this poetry challenge with me before but I do hope we have some newbies this year. This is the EIGHTH year that I have done this poetry writing challenge so I want to add some different poetry forms but I also enjoy sticking with some of our favorite tried and true poems.

I’ve noticed with the coronavirus this year that people are already writing Haikus about it. Many are using the heading “Love in the time of COVID-19” as their topic. So, you can do that if you wish (and we will get to Haikus, eventually, because, well . . . Haiku), but I thought we would start out with a DIFFERENT Japanese poetic form for the first day of our challenge. Like many Japanese poetry styles, this one focuses on counting syllables – but not the same three lines of 5,7,5 syllables as the Haiku. We are going to write a DODOITSU poem today. Fun times!!!

Here’s a bit of background: Dodoitsu poems appeared around the late 1860s. They were favored by working-class citizens. The name’s translation is basically, “quickly, city to city.” Some say that it refers to the ease with which they were passed along. The Dodoitsu has even been called the “Japanese limerick” as most revolved around love, work, and daily life, from a humorous perspective; so as a general rule, they did not explore deep thoughts. But rather, they were used as a way to record those off-the-wall funny moments in one’s day. I have a dear friend who writes AT LEAST a poem a day and includes her poems in her journal as they usually reflect her day. See what you come up with.

Here is the format:

FOUR LINES: (only counting syllables – no rhyming required, nor excluded . . . just whatever).

The first 3 lines ALL HAVE SEVEN SYLLABLES.
And the 4th line has FIVE SYLLABLES.

That’s it ~ simple, right? Yeah, give it a try. Write as many as suits your fancy today.

~~~~

Feel free to share your poems in the comments here on my blog (ALL CREATIVE WORK REMAINS THE PROPERTY OF THE AUTHOR) or in our FB group – you'll find the link below, or directly on your own FB wall, or Instagram, or your blog, or just keep a notebook of your poems this month – whatever suits your fancy. We DO love seeing each other’s poems though.

However, if you do share it on your own social media pages, please do not copy and paste these directions, but rather just link back to this page. See additional conditions below. Thanks.

Here is a VERY helpful syllable counter to double-check each line:


Here are my efforts for this (new to me – and probably you) poetry style:


Today our online art class

Critiqued each other’s artwork

Depicting contradiction:

Comfortable bra

                              © 2020 Stephanie Abney

 


















(By way of explanation for these crazy "bra" photos - it was a 3-D piece of artwork that needed to include dye resist of the fabric and embroidery while depicting a "contradiction"). 



The internet is so slow

Because everyone is on 

132 tabs open

Might be a problem

                             © 2020 Stephanie Abney


This is the link to our FB group – just ask to join:

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Day 30 ~ Free Choice for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



LAST DAY OF "30 Poems in 30 Days" ~ If you’ve been following all month (April – “National Poetry Month”) along on this blog, you have seen the work of only 3 or 4 brave souls who have posted their poetry here in the comments of my blog, but we also have a FB Poetry group where lots of poetry has been posted. It occurs to me NOW on the last day of Poetry Month that I should have been including a link to the group with each post – I’ll try to go back and add that in for those who find these posts at other times of the year. 

I have also received poems via email from a couple of participants and lots of those who joined us this year regularly post their poems on their own blogs and/or their personal or author FB pages so the results of this month-long poetry challenge “30 poems in 30 days” are evidenced all over the place.



It has been so enjoyable and very gratifying to me to read the poems from those who participated. So much talent out there and I think, once again, I have proven my point that ANYONE can learn to write poetry. Thanks for joining me this year and I hope to see y’all back next year and bring your friends!!

The FB group is a “closed group” but anyone can request to join – and it is available to post in at any time. We’ve gotten to know one another there and would love to hear any of your good news and certainly you are free to post any poetry that you write throughout the year there to share with the group despite the name of the group being “A Month of Poetry ‘30 Poems in 30 Days’ April #National Poetry Month.”

So, for today, the last day of National Poetry Month, I’d love to hear your comments on what this has brought to you. What have you learned? What did you love? What frustrated you (if anything)? Did you discover you were a poet and didn’t even know it?

Feel free to share that here on this blog and/or in our FB poetry group.

And today’s challenge? Choose a favorite poetic form that we have worked on this month and surprise us!! 

It has been my pleasure to lead this challenge (this is my 7th year doing so) and my privilege to have a front-row seat to your creative efforts. Cheers!!


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Photo credit: Pixabay

Monday, April 29, 2019

Day 29 ~ Bio Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"




There are all kinds of “Bio Poems” and “All About Me” poetic forms out there so today we are going to follow a simple little format that produces a surprisingly powerful poem – ABOUT YOU!!

It is basically a 9-line poem with no specific requirements as to rhyming or syllables. However, each line has a prompt to be followed:

Any words in BLUE should be PART of your poem – only the first two lines “ask a question” and the answer to it becomes part of the poem – for the rest – start out with the part in blue and fill in the blank with whatever suits you.

Line 1: Your first name _________________
Line 2: Three words that describe you ______________________________
Line 3: Who enjoys _____________________________________________
Line 4: Who is able to ___________________________________________
Line 5: Who feels _______________________________________________
Line 6: Who wonders ____________________________________________
Line 7: Who fears ______________________________________________
Line 8: Who cares about _________________________________________
Line 9: Who dreams of ___________________________________________



I haven’t written a bio poem for this particular format yet and I have some appointments this morning that will prevent me from taking time to create on to share so I’ll just let y’all come up with your own. Enjoy!!

In the interest of "full disclosure" and giving proper attribution (although I have seen so many variations of this type of poem), I did find this particular format in a free download from a teacher, Laura Candler, as found at "Teachers Pay Teachers" ~ here is the link: FREE Bio Poems Made Easy ~ TPT (Teachers Pay Teachers) was always one of my favorite places to get great material when I was teaching full-time. I still go there when working with my grandkids. So, it might be a useful resource for some of you out there. (I added my own "spin" to it by naming the lines and highlighting the beginning prompts in blue). 

Blessings!!


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo credit: Mihai Paraschiv at Pixabay

Sunday, April 28, 2019

Day 28 ~ Cinquain Pattern 3 for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



OK, let’s revisit the Cinquain Poem – it always has FIVE LINES, but sometimes you count the syllables per line and sometimes you count the words per line, but this time, the version I call “Pattern 3,” you fill each line in ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTIONS BELOW!! J

This Cinquain Poem has a certain number of words for lines 1, 2, 3, and 5 but line 4 is any phrase (just a short sentence) you want to use so it sort of “pull it all together”

Here is the PATTERN:   

Line1: A noun
Line 2: Two adjectives
Line 3: Three -ing words
Line 4: A phrase
Line 5: Another word for the noun

Here are two examples of mine:
                                                                    


Dancer
Graceful, lyrical
Leaping, twirling, spinning
My beautiful granddaughter
Payton

                                                                                                                           © 2019 Stephanie Abney




Babies
Sweet, precious
Laughing, babbling, crying
If only they stayed little
Adorable

                                                                                                                                    © 2011 Stephanie Abney


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

Photo credit: sobima at Pixabay





Saturday, April 27, 2019

Day 27 ~ “Terse Verse” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth


We have had SO much fun with this the last two years that I thought it would be perfect for your busy Saturday.

It will put a smile on your face!! It takes a bit of figuring things out at first, but once you get the hang of it – it’s hard to stop creating them!!

A “Terse Verse” is usually funny. It’s actually a riddle with a two-word rhyming answer; basically a synonym . . . The tricky part is that the two words in the answer must also have the same number of syllables. 

So, if you use a one-syllable word for the first word, then the second word also needs to be a one-syllable word or both need to be 2 syllables, etc.

Here are a few of my examples:             



RIDDLE QUESTION: What do you call a joke-telling rabbit?
TERSE VERSE (answer): “Funny Bunny”







What do you call a miserable cat?
“Crabby Tabby”




What do you call a cucumber that can’t make up its mind?
“Fickle Pickle”






What do you call polite frozen water?
“Nice Ice”

            All of the above terse verses © Stephanie Abney

I think the Rhyme Zone tool would come in handy for this – it might be easier to approach this poetry form backward by finding a double rhyming two-word phrase with equal syllables and then create a question or riddle for it.
Here’s the Rhyme Zone tool link: http://www.rhymezone.com/

And here are a few from some of the participants of “Poetry Month” – they gave me permission to use in my book (still forthcoming) so I’m pretty sure they are good with me sharing their cleverness here!!



What do you call a dog that writes?
Blog Dog
                        ~ © 2018 Connie Cockrell

What do you call an antique tire?
Rare Spare.
                        ~ © 2018 Sue Fullmer

What do you call a donut on social media?
Twitter Fritter
                        ~ © 2018 Victoria Firth

What do you call laughing pennies?
Funny Money
                        ~ © 2017 Peggy Barker 



PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.

[photo credits: found at Pixabay]