Friday, April 19, 2019

Day 19 ~ Rhyme Royal Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth and "30 poems in 30 days"



Okay – I actually wanted to introduce 7-lined poems which are called “septets.”

A septet can be a poem of any form or meter as long as it has seven lines. 

But before you rush off to do that – let’s explore a SPECIFIC type of septet: a RHYME ROYAL. This is actually the most common form of septet poetry and the only 7-lined poem to have its own special name.

A Rhyme Royal was popularized by Geoffrey Chaucer and it began to be called “royal” because James I of Scotland used it for his own verses.

It has VERY SPECIFIC guidelines, which are:

SEVEN LINES, each having EXACTLY TEN SYLLABLES in them.

There is also a SPECIFIC rhyming PATTERN: a·b·a·b·b·c·c

An example can be found in William Wordsworth poem, “Resolution and Independence.”


So your topic can be anything as long as the poem is 7 lines long and each line has 10 syllables in it and the ending rhymes follow the pattern a·b·a·b·b·c·c

And it that makes you crazy, just write any ol’ septet, which a seven-lined poem of any form you choose, included free verse.

Here is my example:


Being with my family is the best.
Laughing, crying, and playing together.
We have such fun when we are on quest.
Loving and supporting one another.
Father and mother, sister and brother.
Families can be eternally bound.
This is the way true happiness is found.
    
                                     © 2019 Stephanie Abney

And here I have broken it down by lines and ending rhymes:

1. Being with my family is the best. A
2. Laughing, crying, and playing together. B
3. We have such fun when we are on quest. A
4. Loving and supporting one another. B
5. Father and mother, sister and brother. B
6. Families can be eternally bound. C
7. This is the way true happiness is found. C

Okay, YOUR TURN!! Cheers!!


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.

Photo credit: kai kalhh at Pixabay (family silhouette)



2 comments:

Heidi L. Murphy said...

Alrighty then. Strap in for my day 19: https://murph4slaw.blogspot.com/2019/04/day-19-national-poetry-month-rhyme.html

Connie Cockrell said...

Whew! I found this a bit tricky but eventually came up with:

"The Sun"

The day begins with sky—gold, pink and blue,
As the sun warms the earth, night creatures hide,
The heat to avoid, while day beasts come through,
They look for their food, the sun they abide.
The birds fly afar, the currents they ride.
Great and small, creatures do run, fly and crawl,
Including us humans, big or so small.