Thursday, April 19, 2018

Day 19 ~ Cinquain Poem (pattern 1) for #NationalPoetryMonth for “30 poems in 30 days”


I really love cinquain poetry. Depending on where you get your instructions there are a few variations. I’ve narrowed it down to three. Last year I shared all three variations in one post but today I think I will share with you the version I call “pattern one.”

Cinq is French for FIVE ~ this poem has five lines that follow a specific pattern, each line has its own purpose; title/subject, describe subject, express ACTION, then share a thought of feeling and for the end, you will restate your title using a different word(s), with only a two syllable count. DETAILS of how it goes are below in yellow.

This short five-lined poem doesn’t have an actual title; rather, the FIRST line (two syllables in this case) becomes the title.

It does not rhyme and in this version you count the number of SYLLABLES per line and each line has specific requirements. The first line has 2 syllables; each line increases by 2 syllables until the last line, which returns to 2 syllables.

RESIST the urge to add words - follow the pattern - you'll be surprised at your results!!

1st line ~ two syllables – the subject (or title) or your poem
2nd line ~ four syllables that describe the title/subject
3rd line ~ six syllables that express action
4th line ~ eight syllables that express a thought or feeling
5th line ~ two syllables that show a synonym for the title (restates your subject using a different word)

Here are some of my poems as examples that I wrote some time ago but they are good samples of a cinquain poem, (pattern 1):


Poems
Feelings expressed
From down deep in my heart
So you know who I am I’ll sing
Word Songs

© 2011 Stephanie Abney
          





Children
A gift from God
Grace our lives for a time
Remain in our hearts forever
Precious


   © 1999 Stephanie Abney  





Comfort
Feeling secure
Where judgment has no place
Wrapped in the safety of your arms
Husband

    © 1998 Stephanie Abney



Let’s create!!

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work. 


Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Day 18 ~ “Lantern Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days" #NationalPoetryMonth



Today’s poem is a simple little Japanese poetry form called a "Lantern Poem," a five-line poem in the shape of a Japanese lantern. Please note that each line is specific in what the word(s) should be describing and then also note the number of syllables per line. These poems do not have titles – the first line is basically the title.



      






Here's the Pattern:

  Line 1: noun (one syllable)
 Line 2: describe the noun (two syllables)
 Line 3: describe the noun (three syllables
 Line 4: describe the noun (four syllables)
 Line 5: synonym for the noun in line one (one syllable)

After you have written your poem, “center align” it and it should be somewhat in the shape of a Chinese lantern.


So here are a few examples to get you started:



Kind

Caring

One who serves

Without judgment

You
© 2018 Stephanie Abney





Rest
Slumber
Forty Winks
Restorative
Sleep

© 2016 Stephanie Abney




Trust
Faithful
Always there
Can depend on
You

© 2014 Stephanie Abney




     House
   Mansion
Dwelling place
  Habitation
      Home

                                                  © 2011 Mary Walling (deceased;
                          was a member of our poetry challenge)


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.



Tuesday, April 17, 2018

DAY 17 ~ “Haiku Poem” for "30 Poems in 30 Days" #NationalPoetryMonth



OK, before you say, “Oh good, Haiku, I KNOW how to do that” and rush off – how about taking a few minutes to read what I have to say because I bet there may be a few things you might not know about it. At any rate, humor me for just a minute or two.


First off – there are TWO REASONS I chose to feature Haiku today ~ Day 17 of our “Month of Poetry.”


1st: Today, April 17th is actually “International Haiku Poetry Day”


2nd: If you add up the syllables in all three lines, 5+7+5, it equals 17; hence today is the perfect day for us to write a HAIKU!! Cheers!!


Here is a link to a bit of history about Haiku if you are interested:

Almost everyone has probably heard of “Haiku” poetry. It’s a very popular form of Japanese poetry. I bet a lot of you have tried your hand at it already. Technically, there is Japanese Haiku and then, for our purposes, there is “English Language Haiku” (unless you happen to be fluent in Japanese).


Basically, use simple words. This is a compact form of poetry, yet usually very meaningful. Use your words to paint pictures in the reader’s mind.

Haiku poems are written about everyday things. They tend to be about nature, particularly about the seasons, but you can write one about other things as well; feelings, experiences, etc. 

~ IF you go with a nature theme, then the last line usually has a season word in it, but again ~ be creative and do it your way.

DID YOU KNOW? Haikus are supposed to ALWAYS be written in PRESENT TENSE!

Keep it simple. Try to capture a moment in time, scene, image from a specific time (using present tense) in just a few words.

It’s only three lines and we will be counting a precise number of syllables per line again. No rhyming needed for Haiku. There are a total of 17 syllables for the entire poem, following the pattern below:


Line 1: 5 syllables
Line 2: 7 syllables
Line 3: 5 syllables

You need to pay attention to the number of SYLLABLES, not
words. If you need to double check o how many syllables a 
word has, you can use this syllable counter:



Here are a few examples:




Flowers, birds, and hope

In a colorful array

Spring bursts through my door

© 2017 Stephanie Abney







A ball of fire

Slips behind the horizon

A summer goodnight

© 2016 Stephanie Abney

















A soft, gentle breeze

Tickles leaves in my front yard

And I know He’s there.

© 2011 Stephanie Abney




To my son, Brian

You are always in my heart

I feel you near me

© 2014 Stephanie Abney


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work. 

Monday, April 16, 2018

Day 16 ~ “Brevette Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth


How to write a Brevette Poem:

So this LOOKS simple – THREE WORDS? Yeah, but it can be tricky ~ The Brevette ~ check it out!! It will be tricky for me because I struggle with brevity! Titles optional.

ONLY THREE WORDS? Yikes!!

There are a FEW particulars to this poetry form created by Emily Romano. Here’s a little grammar for you – I know you love it – this poem consists of TWO NOUNS & a VERB:

  • LINE 1: a subject (noun)
  • LINE 2: a verb (the verb has a space between each letter:  v e r b)
  • LINE 3: an object (noun)


They need to STAY in that exact order and yeah, there is ONE MORE THING!! In order for the verb to show an ongoing action, it is spaced out, letter by letter.

Whether or not you include a title is up to you, but otherwise, there is NO punctuation, and all words are lower case ~

THREE WORDSdon’t be adding “helping verbs” or “articles” – that’s cheating. Coming up with a subject and an object for the nouns is surprisingly difficult. Seriously, this is trickier than it seems. So, here are a couple of examples, some better than others:

Example #1: (no title)

rainbow
r a d i a t e s
spectrum
111
      © 2007 Emily Romano

Example #2:
“Knotted Strings”

patience
u n t a n g l e s
knots
© 2018 Stephanie Abney

Example #3:
“On the run”

dog
s m e l l s
escapes
      © 2017 Stephanie Abney


Example #4:
“Never Give Up”

dreams
c o m e
true

© 2018 Stephanie Abney




Example #5:
“Crying”

eyes
l e a k
tears
      © 2017 Stephanie Abney

Example #6:
“Keep believing”

dreams
f o l l o w
passion
      © 2017 Stephanie Abney


Please remember any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments section of this blog. They are the property of the person who shares them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them in any form without their express permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to it. Thanks!! 

And if you choose to post your poems on your own blog – that’s awesome. But please don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem and LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to read the instructions. Thanks for respecting my work.




Sunday, April 15, 2018

Day 15 ~ “Pyramid Poem” for #NationalPoetryMonth “30 poems in 30 days”because


It’s hard to believe the month of April is half over. It feels like we’ve only just begun. Hmmm, what poetry form should we use today? What to write about? Do you like to participate in Karaoke? If so, this might be a fun week to feature it in one of your poems because April 15-21 is “National Karaoke Week.”

We’ll save the ever famous Haiku for April 17th which is “International Haiku Poetry Day.” So, for today, let’s work on a “Pyramid Poem.”

This is quite simple, if you follow the rules ~ it’s one of those “parts of speech” poems, (great for classroom teachers and homeschoolers). It has some repetition in it, which is part of its charm. It’s a fun one where each line builds off of the previous line as certain words are intentionally carried over.

When all is said and done – if you center the words (which I realize you can’t do in the comment section here or on a FB post) – but when you save it for yourself or post it on your own blog, center the words so the poem is in the shape of a pyramid. It’s a rather unique poetry form that I have only used once before as part of this #30Poemsin30Days Challenge, 3 years ago. … so let’s begin:

Here is the format ~ one word for part of speech indicated on each line BUT THE CATCH IS ~ once you have selected a word for NOUN – that same needs to be used EVERY time a NOUN is called for in the poem, same for the adjective you choose and so forth. Syllable counts, word counts and rhyming are not specific or a requirement, although some may occur, BUT using the same word for a particular part of speech IS a requirement.

Here is the pattern:

Line 1: noun
Line 2: adjective noun
Line 3: adjective noun verb
Line 4: adjective noun verb adverb
Line 5: adjective noun verb adverb prepositional phrase
I found easy to follow example online at www.scholastic.com/ but no author credit was given (I took the picture - I LOVE clouds):



Clouds
Puffy clouds
Puffy clouds float
Puffy clouds float sleepily
Puffy clouds float sleepily across the horizon


And here’s an example I wrote:

Children
Sweet children
Sweet children play
Sweet children play happily
Sweet children play happily at Grandma’s house

                                                           © 2015 Stephanie Abney


Please remember any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments section of this blog. They are the property of the person who shares them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them in any form without their express permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to it. Thanks!! 

And if you choose to post your poems on your own blog – that’s awesome. But please don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem and LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to read the instructions. Thanks for respecting my work.




Saturday, April 14, 2018

Day 14 ~ "Senses Poem" for 30 Poems in 30 Days" #NationalPoetryMonth


So, basically this “Senses Poem” seems like a simple, forthright poem. BUT it is open to a number of variations that can keep you busy with it for quite some time!! You can have lots of fun with this poem. There is no need to worry about rhyming or counting syllables, although it does have other requirements (basically just to “fill in the blanks”) and it can be pulled together in several ways – try each of them, if you wish, or just choose one way to share your poem.

So first, everyone is familiar with the “FIVE SENSES” ~ sight, smell, hear, touch, and taste. 

But many have argued that there are SIX SENSES if you consider your mind ("I think") as one of the senses. 

Hence, we are writing a FIVE SENSES and/or SIX SENSES POEM today!! Cheers!!

Chose a topic and describe it using each of your six senses, one per line/

Here is a SIX SENSES format to follow, BUT feel free to rearrange the order the various senses you use to describe your object/topic.

  1.    I see ____________________________
  2.    I smell ___________________________
  3.    I hear ___________________________
  4.    I feel (as in touch) __________________
  5.    I taste ____________________________
  6.    I think ____________________________

Now, if you want to concentrate on the FIVE SENSES – you can change “I see” to "It looks like," etc.

  1.    It looks like (instead of I see) _________________
  2.    It smells like _______________________________
  3.    It sounds like (instead of I hear) _______________
  4.    It feels like _________________________________
  5.    It tastes like ________________________________

So, you CAN just leave it like it is once you fill in the blanks (in any order using either five or six senses) and remove the numbers; you don’t need those. That will give you a great poem by just doing that.

OR you can remove most of the PRONOUNS, VERBS, and ARTICLES and get a new effect.

Think of a place that is special. Form an image in your mind of this place. Then complete the following statements.

Here’s one example, taken step-by-step.

(I grew up in southern California and would go to the beach every chance I got)  . . .

First – fill in the blanks:

1.       I see ______________   the breaking waves
2.       I smell _____________  the seaweed-tinged air
3.       I hear ______________  the seagulls squawking overhead
4.       I feel (as in touch) ____  the wet sand squishing between my toes
5.       I taste ______________  the salty ocean water
6.       I think ______________  I’m back in my childhood heaven

OK, so, if I remove the line numbers and get rid of the lines it turns out like this:

I see the breaking waves
I smell the seaweed-tinged air
I hear the seagulls squawking overhead
I feel the wet sand squishing between my toes
I taste the salty ocean water
I think I’m back in my childhood heaven 
                       © 2017 Stephanie Abney

And that makes a nice poem BUT, if I remove most of the pronouns, verbs and articles, then I get this one; also a very nice poem:



breaking waves
seaweed-tinged air
seagulls squawking overhead
wet sand squishing between my toes
salty ocean water
my childhood heaven
  © 2017 Stephanie Abney

                                                



And that makes a new version of the same poem and it’s pretty cool as well.

OR you can use the other format with FIVE senses and follow the same steps; fill in the blanks, then take away the numbers and even remove the pronouns, select verbs and articles and see what you get:
   
  1.    It looks like (instead of I see) _________________
  2.    It smells like _______________________________
  3.    It sounds like (instead of I hear) _______________
  4.    It feels like _________________________________
  5.    It tastes like ________________________________

So, there are a few different ways to approach this type of poem. Enjoy!!

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or you FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work.