Monday, April 30, 2018

Day 30 ~ Questad Poem for #NationalPoetryMonth “30 Poems in 30 Days”


Well, my poetic friends, looks like we have come to the end of "National Poetry Month." Kind of feels sad, doesn't it? I hope you have had fun and will continue to write poetry – do some searches for various types of poems. The list is endless (a little hyperbole for ya’).

I can’t tell you how much I enjoy April because of the responses I see to my daily poetry challenges. There are other challenges out there and I hope you can always find what you need to inspire you to create your poems. I have been in awe of a lot of the work I have seen. Some gets posted here, but most get posted on FB, Instagram, other people’s blogs, etc. and I do see a lot of it, but from the number of visits to this blog each day in the month of April, whether I’m able to see the poems and enjoy them or not, I know people are writing and enjoying poetry and that is my goal. Glad you have come along this year. So . . .

I thought for the last day we would do a Questad Poem; it’s a poem that kind of brings it all together – many of the things we have learned or practiced this month are contained in this unique and somewhat uncommon poetry form. I have included a chart with details created by Carolyn Osborne, a teacher. 

Have fun – I have included a Questad Poem I wrote a few years ago as an example in case I don’t get back to this post to include one I write today. We’ll see, but here ya’ go:

Line
Directions
Example
Your Draft
1
Title—topic of poem
Cars
By Eric Harker

2
Personification
They seem to sing when you rev up the engine

3
Hyperbole
The sound is sweeter than honey

4
Alliteration
Purring proudly like a pack of panthers

5
Onomatopoeia
VROOM!

6
Metaphor
It is a shiny dream in the eyes of a child,

7
Simile
Speeding like the space shuttle

8
Imagery
Gleaming with silvery metallic paint along a black road of fragrant tar.


I got the above chart from:worldowiki.wikispaces.com/file/view/Poetry+Alternatives.doc (and if you go there – it will pull up a 22-page doc that has lots of poetry forms and instructions) – for your continued poetry writing pleasure.


Here’s my poem:
Poems,
Heartsongs made visible,
Rising from the depths of my soul,
Pretty, poised parcels of perfection,
Pitter-patter through my mind.
Poems are microscopic slides of slices of my life,
Dancing through my days like a prima ballerina,
Revealing my authentic self; raw, vulnerable and honest.
© 2014 Stephanie Abney


PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others. 

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Day 29 ~ Wishing Poems for #NationalPoetryMonth “30 Poems in 30 Days”



There are many ways to write a “wishing poem.” Most people are familiar with the childhood chant:

Star light, star bright,

First star I see tonight,

I wish I may, I wish I might,

Have this wish I wish tonight.


Today is “National Wish Day” in reference to the Make-a-Wish Foundation. Our youngest son received a wish from Make-a-Wish when he was battling leukemia. He asked for a “freestanding woodworking workshop with electricity and power tools.” No one had ever wished for that before but his wish granters found a way. He spent many happy days in his workshop making all sorts of wood creations before he succumbed to his cancer.

 


Since there is no one set way to write a “wish poem” I’m just going to provide you with several links to examples of wish poems and let you pick and choose whatever works for you. Cheers!! (Sadly, tomorrow is our last day).

Here is the most typical form – each line actually starts with “I wish” until the very end and then you can create a concluding line or two – some people would consider this a “List Poem” and the jury is out on if it’s a “real” poem, but I say, why not? It expresses things the poet wishes (there’s our word!!) to share, so, it’s p-o-e-t-r-y!! Right?

This very quick YouTube tutorial will get you started:
https://youtu.be/AE42bMnQSls (“I Wish Poems”)



This one is actually an example of a “Hope Poem” which is kind of the same thing: (“I Wish for Peace”) https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/i-wish-for-peace

Here is a touching example written by a mother grieving the loss of her child: https://www.herfamily.ie/parenthood/wish-show-world-beautiful-poem-bereaved-mum-247211 (“'I Wish I Could Show You The World'”)

(“Poetry Prompt: Rhyming Wish Poems”)


Best Wishes Poems (examples)

So, these links should be plenty to get your creative juices going!! Whatcha’ got?

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work and the creative work of others.


Saturday, April 28, 2018

Day 28 ~ “Hero Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth


Let’s Write a “Hero Poem” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth

Hero poems are found in every culture. There is no one right way to write a hero poem. Since today, April 28, 2018, is “National Superhero Day” I thought it would be fun to write a poem about our heroes. In fact, most of you will probably end up with several poems if you have the time to write them.

Instead of giving specific directions for one certain style of poem, I’ll leave it up to you to use one (or several) of the poetry forms we have been practicing this year OR just back to the ol’ free verse variety in order to honor someone who is YOUR superhero. Think about what traits make this person a hero to you and then write about them.


In researching just the terms “hero poetry” I found some interesting things and you might want to do a similar search. These poems are often epic poems; narratives that cover quite a bit about a person and/or event (think in terms of “Paul Revere’s Ride”). Another word for these poems are “Courage Poems” ~ I think one of the poetic styles for writing a hero poem that intrigued me the most was the “African Praise Song.”


So, instead of giving directions, I’ll post several links that I think are interesting and they might give you some ideas of what you want to do when you write a poem about YOUR SUPERHERO!! Have fun.

I’ll be right there along with you (as soon as I finish taking my American Lit test). 



Then, I hope to come back and edit this with my a few superhero poems of my own. Until then ~ check these out if it interests you:



Student example of a “hero/courage poem” ~

African Praise Songs:



ENJOY!!




PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!


Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work. 

Friday, April 27, 2018

Day 27 ~ “Terse Verse” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth


Last year I introduced “Terse Verse” for the first time. Everyone had SO much fun with it that I think we should do it again!! It will put a smile on your face!! It takes a bit of figuring things out at first, but once you get the hang of it – it’s hard to stop creating them!!

Let’s have some fun!! A “Terse Verse” is usually funny. It’s actually a riddle with a two-word rhyming answer; basically a synonym . . . The tricky part is that the two words in the answer must also have the same number of syllables.

Here are a few examples from the web:

What do you call a rabbit’s seat?
TERSE VERSE (answer): “Hare’s Chair.”

What do you call a quizzing friend?
“Study Buddy”

What makes a dark room bright?
“Night Light”

What do you call a pig in an earthquake?
“Shaken Bacon”

I think the "Rhyme Zone" tool will come in handy for this – it might be easier to approach this poetry form backward by finding a double rhyming two-word phrase with equal syllables and then create a question or riddle for it.

Here’s the Rhyme Zone tool link: http://www.rhymezone.com/

Crazy, right? Here are a few I came up with:





What do you call a miserable cat?

“Crabby Tabby”





What do you call a cucumber that can’t make up its mind?

“Fickle Pickle”











What do you call an angry garbanzo?

“Mean Bean”




What do you call polite frozen water?

“Nice Ice”









What do you call a joke-telling rabbit?

“Funny Bunny”







Please remember any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments section of this blog. They are the property of the person who shares them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them in any form without their express permission. It is understood that they own the copyright to it. Thanks!! 

And if you choose to post your poems on your own blog – that’s awesome. But please don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem and LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to read the instructions. Thanks for respecting my work.


Thursday, April 26, 2018

Day 26 ~ "Poem in Your Pocket" for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth



So, yesterday I mentioned that today is “Poem in Your Pocket Day.”  Fun stuff and we will be celebrating it by choosing a poem and carrying it with you today and sharing it with others any way you wish.

And I think it would be AWESOME if the poem you choose is one that YOU wrote! But, any poem is just fine.

One of the easiest ways is via social media using this hash-tag: #pocketpoem. So, I think you should pick one of your own original poems or find a poem you like . . . you can even make copies of it to hand out or just one copy that you carry around all day and hopefully share with others.


I’d like to share a poem about this day written by one of our regular participants in my April Poetry Month Challenge. It’s great little poem and I share it here with her permission:

Poem in Your Pocket Day

Take some time on this very special day

To find a favorite poem for a fun holiday

It may be one that makes you laugh or smile

Or even one that makes you think a while



It can be one you've written yourself

Or one you find upon a Library shelf

Just keep it with you throughout the day

Then share with those who come your way.

© 2017 Vicki Firth 

So, that’s pretty much it for today – Enjoy!!!!

Here’s a link from the “National Poetry Month” website all about “Poem in Your Pocket Day


It even has a downloadable Poem in Your Pocket Day PDF where you can get ideas for celebrating or suggested poems to carry in your pocket today (I kind of hope you will carry one of your own original ones).



Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Day 25 ~ “Free Verse Poems” for “30 Poems in 30 Days” #NationalPoetryMonth



So, today let’s just abandon all the rules (as some of you fabulous poets out there prefer to do anyway) and write a free verse poem about anything you choose.

I just want to point out that “free verse” is NOT the same thing as “blank verse.”

Blank verse IS unrhymed but surprisingly, it DOES have rules - rules that pertain to things like “iambic pentameter” with unstressed/stressed syllable patterns or “trochee” with stressed/unstressed or even more craziness, how about dactyl blank verse with has stressed/unstressed/unstressed syllable patterns? There is also “anapest blank verse” – yeah, we’ll just stop there. So, we are not writing blank verse today ~ just free verse. And if nothing strikes your fancy – just use a favorite poetry form that we have used earlier this month.

So, FREE VERSE is basically random, without any fixed metrical patterns of any kind and while there is no need to rhyme, it’s totally fine if you wish to use rhyme, but there is no need to count syllables or to worry about much of anything – just let it come. But free verse is actually tricky to make it feel cohesive, but once you get it just how you want it – you will be most happy with it. Free verse poems can be long, short or anything in between, as long as it seems to have a good flow, then you are good to go.

Nature, family, life, love, religion, whatever comes to mind ~ go for it. I think its also fun to use “National” and “World” celebration days as prompts for here are a few of them for April 25,  2018:

Denim Day, DNA Day, Hairstylists Appreciation Day, International Guide Dog Day, International Marconi Day, National Crayola Day, National Golf Day, National Mani-Pedi Day, National Plumber's Day, National Zucchini Bread Day, Red Hat Society Day, World Penguin Day, and World Stationery Day, to name a few.

OH, and head’s up – tomorrow is “Poem in my Pocket” day – so instead of writing a poem, we will try to memorize a poem and/or make copies of it to hand out to share with friends and family – more on that tomorrow. (And, of course, you can always use one of the poems you have written for this).

So, here is one of my favorite free verse poems I have written (a few years ago, but that’s okay):














HOPE

Hope creates options.
It still can happen.
In fact, anything CAN happen.
Hope is what we cling to.
I hope I am doing enough.
I hope people understand the purity of my motives.
I hope my family will all be together in the hereafter.

Why do I have hope?
Because I believe what Christ said when He came.
I believe He really did die for our sins and that
through the atonement of Christ
and the power of the resurrection;
I can be raised up unto life eternal with my loved ones.
That is what I hope for.

And because I have hope
. . . I keep trying.
© 2015 Stephanie Abney

PLEASE REMEMBER ~ any poetry found on this blog, written by me, is my personal property and may not be used without my permission, other than sharing it as an example in a lesson or to read it to someone. The same goes for any poems that are shared in the comments of this blog or elsewhere online as a result of this challenge. They are the creative property of the person who writes them. These poems are their original work and no one may use them without their permission. It is understood that they own the copyright for to them as soon as they post them. Thanks so much!

Also, if you choose to post your poems on your own blog ~ that’s awesome. But PLEASE don’t just copy and paste my daily instructions, but rather post your poem on your blog or your FB wall or wherever AND LINK BACK TO THIS BLOG POST for others to come here to read the instructions. I’ve spent considerable time researching the poetry forms and writing them up to share with you. Thanks for respecting my work. 

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

DAY 24 ~ “What if . . . I might” Poem for “30 Poems in 30 Days" #NationalPoetryMonth


This is basically a “finish the sentence” type of poetry form.

This is a poem that will get you thinking of many possibilities; some thoughtful, others silly, some adventurous, or even fanciful, some surprisingly profound. Let your imagination go or reach deep into your heart. 

SEVEN LINES:

Fill in the blanks any way you want – changing the words you can create dozens of poems.

Line #1:  What if ____________________________
Line #2:  I might ____________________________

(leave a space between lines 2 & 3)
 
Line #3:  What if ____________________________
Line #4:  I could _____________________________

(leave a space between lines 4 & 5)

Line #5:  What if ____________________________
Line #6:  I would_____________________________

(leave a space between lines 6 & 7)
 
Line #7:  Ask a question.


Have fun!!

HERE ARE MY EXAMPLES – (from a few years ago)
At first, I was planning to write new ones for this year, but, as I sometimes do, I am running late and these examples give you a good enough idea. I’m anxious to see what you come up with though!! Cheers!!









The first one is silly: 

What if I danced in the rain?
I might get a little bit wet.
What if I sang at the top of my lungs?
I could land a singing contract, I bet.

What if I went back inside and sat down?
I would never know what I might do.

I wonder, would you be so bold, if it were you?

                                      © 2011 Stephanie Abney




This one is more serious:

What if I listened very carefully to the spirit?
I might be surprised at what I hear.

What if the Lord has plans I'm not ready for?
I could try to pretend I didn't hear them.

What if I listened and obeyed?
I would be more use to His children.

Do you think I'm that strong?
                               © 2011 Stephanie Abney